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May 24, 2017

On This Day in 1995:

Some 2,300 members of the United Rubber Workers, on strike for 10 months against five Bridgestone-Firestone plants, agree to return to work without a contract. They had been fighting demands for 12-hour shifts and wage increases tied to productivity gains.

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Labor Headlines

US labour news headlines from LabourStart

Association of Retired Members #355

Welcome to the Retirees' Club!

Retired members of Local 355 formed the Association of Retired Members (ARM) around 1956, and currently have 600+ members. The main purpose of the club is to provide its members with recreation, exercise and fellowship.

The club meets once every month on the third Thursday of the month, except August and December. There is an Executive Board meeting at 10 a.m. followed by the General Meeting at 11 a.m. Coffee and donuts are offered at 9:30 a.m. and a light lunch is provided after the meetings.

ARM Bowling League: Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. Glen Burnie Bowling Center, Beltway Crossing Shopping Center, 6322 Richie Highway, Glen Burnie. Bowling, bowling shoes and coffee are free. The bowling season starts the first week in September, and ends the first week of May. The Bowling Awards Banquet for bowlers only is held the first Wednesday after bowling season ends.

Annual Parties: The Summer Party is held the third Thursday of August (in place of the monthly meeting) and the Christmas Party, the third Thursday of December. All ARM members and one guest are cordially invited to attend both events.

ARM Executive Board:

President: Bob Eney

Vice President: Joe Reichert

Recording Secretary: Mike Brett

Treasurer: Frank Supiot

Sgt. at Arms: Charles Steven

Trustees: Ronn Cain, Ed Jackson, Ray Bularz, Tom Miskimon


2017 A.R.M. Bowling Banquet
May 11, 2017

(L-R) A.R.M. president Bob Eney, Mel Holden, Vice President Joe Riechert, and Recording Secretary Mike Brett

The retirees club held it's annual Bowlers Banquet on Wednesday, May 3rd, at the Baltimore Union Hall. Following a sumptuous feast of barbecue pit beef, seasoned shrimp, sausage and peppers, potatoes, green beans, coleslaw, and rolls, bowling awards were distributed.

Last Place: Five-dollar certificates were awarded to Team #16 
Joe Boone
Charlie Stevens
Joe Hal
John Hynes

Third Place: Fifteen-dollar certificates were awarded to Team #13 
Bill Hanna
Art Arminger
Gary Hunt
Ed Death

Second Place: Twenty-dollar certificates were awarded to Team #4 
Bob Eney
Otis Staley
Ed Jarrett
Dennis Adams

First Place: Twenty-five dollar certificates were awarded to Team #8 
Joe Smith
Mickey Moore
Jim Thalberg
Ham
Brisbone

High Set: 422 Steve Wise received a $25 certificate and award

High Game: 188 Mike Krainer received a $25 certificate and award

High Average: 129 Dan Molino received a $25 certificate and award

Most improved: Larry Schwartz and Arthur Jefferson
$15 certificate and award

Attendance: Bill Winters, Art Arminger, Tom Bosley, Mickey Moore, Nam Yong, and Joe Hall

Club members expressed their appreciation and thanks to Bowling coordinators Mike Brett and Joe Reichert, and Mel Holden, who sold the 50/50 tickets to raise money to fund the awards.


March/April 2017 Newsletter
Mar 23, 2017

March/April 2017

Brothers and Sisters:

Even though that great weather forecaster, Punxsutawney Phil, saw his shadow this winter has been very mild. So we still have a couple of weeks left until spring.  
                                  
Upcoming holidays:

  • March 12 is Daylight Saving Day (set your clocks forward one hour)
  • March 17 is Saint Patrick's Day
  • March 20 is the first day of spring (YEA).  
  • April 16 brings us Easter.

   A special thank you to brothers Tom Miskimon, Howard "HOJO" Johnson and James Morgan for hanging the new big screen TV. 

   Pictured, left to right: A.R.M. Trustee Ray Bularz (UPS); Mike Krainer, retired Local 355 trustee, (Sysco); A.R.M. Secretary Mike Brett (UPS); Dave White; A.R.M. President Bob Eney (UPS); A.R.M. Vice President Joe Reichert (Sysco).

Pass The Butter, Please  
   Butter is slightly higher in saturated fats at 8 grams, compared to 5 grams for margarine. Both have the same amount of calories. 
   Eating butter increases the absorption of many other nutrients in other foods. 
   Butter has many nutritional benefits where margarine has a few and only because they are added! 
   Butter tastes much better than margarine, and it can enhance the flavors of other foods. 
   Butter has been around for centuries where margarine has been around for less than 100 years. 
   And now, for Margarine:
   Margarine was originally manufactured to fatten turkeys. When it killed the turkeys, the people who had put all the money into the research wanted payback, so they put their heads together to figure out what to do with this product to get their money back. 
   It was a white substance with no food appeal, so they added the yellow coloring and sold it to people to use in place of butter. How do you like it? 
   Eating margarine can increase heart disease in women by 53% over eating the same amount of butter, according to a recent Harvard Medical Study. 
   Margarine is very high in Trans fatty acid.
   It increases LDL (this is the bad cholesterol) and lowers HDL cholesterol, (the good cholesterol). 
   It increases the risk of cancers up to five times. 
   Margarine lowers quality of breast milk.
   It decreases immune response. 
   It decreases insulin response. 
    And here's the most disturbing fact:  Margarine is but one molecule away from being plastic and shares 27 ingredients with paint.
    These facts alone were enough to have me avoiding margarine for life and anything else that is hydrogenated (this means hydrogen is added, changing the molecular structure of the substance). 
   Open a tub of margarine and leave it open in your garage or shaded area. Within a few days, you will notice a couple of things: 
   No flies, not even those pesky fruit flies will go near it (that should tell you something). 
   It does not rot or smell differently because it has no nutritional value, nothing will grow on it. Even those teeny weeny microorganisms will not a find a home to grow. Why? Because it is nearly plastic. Would you melt your Tupperware and spread that on your toast? 
   Share this with your friends if you want to 'butter them up' for better health! 

(Thanks to Brother Otis Staley, Jr. for "Pass the Butter..." information.)

   Remember, we can always use new bowlers! The Bowling Banquet will be held on May 3 at the Union Hall and is for bowlers only.

New Members: Anthony Bellamy (US Foods)
Sick Members: Ernest Boritz, John Braxton, Joe Gardner, Tyron Howard, John Mayola, Emanuel Brown, Bob Rausch, Gary Rausch, and George Booker.
Deceased Members: None
Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meetings will be on March 16 and April 20 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD.  Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m.  The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m.  A light lunch is served following the general meeting.  Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.   

Fraternally,
Bob Eney, President


Republicans plan attack on Medicaid, Medicare and Social Security
Mar 16, 2017

March 5, 2017

By Eleanor J. Bader/ Truthout

Several years ago, 62-year-old Michael Kaufman, a disabled resident of Bovina, New York, accidently drilled through one of his fingers. He quickly went to the closest Emergency Room where the wound was treated and bandaged. He thought this was all that he needed to do; unfortunately, the next morning, he noticed red streaks traveling up his arm -- a sign of possible blood poisoning -- so he returned to the local ER where medical staff immediately inserted an IV of antibiotics and suggested that he go to a bigger hospital 50 miles away to see a hand specialist, which he did.

Shortly thereafter, the bills started to arrive, and Kaufman found himself saddled with $600 in charges: a $200 co-pay for each of the three ER visits. Lest you think Kaufman was uninsured, he was not. He was -- and still is -- on Medicare, a federally supported health insurance plan provided to the 56 million Americans who receive Social Security Disability or Retirement benefits. Kaufman relies on this insurance to pay for the majority of his medical needs.

"I worked for 40 years and had at least a few years of middle-income earnings," Kaufman told Truthout. "I cared about my work and was hoping to do more of it, but life sets limits. Things happen. I had to leave work much earlier than I planned, but at least there was a backstop. I've been on Disability since 2012 and right now I probably spend an hour or two a week dealing with charges, bills. There's a lot of turnover in medical offices, and records disappear. It's gotten harder and harder to deal with the stress of it. So much depends on having a good memory and keeping good records, but memory diminishes with age."

Despite his obvious frustration with the current health care system, Kaufman makes two things clear: He values Medicare and is adamant about protecting it. He also wants to see it expanded, not cut. "Medicare is a step in the right direction but it is inadequate," he continues. Part A covers only hospitalization. Part B covers only 80 percent of other costs, including outpatient care. "If you don't go to the doctor often, this might not come to much, but if you go a lot, the 20 percent adds up really fast," he says.

What's more, Kaufman stresses that recipients pay for their Part B coverage -- the program operates without a cent of support from federal tax revenues and is instead funded exclusively by employee and employer contributions. The standard Part B premium is presently $134 a month [although the cost is means tested and can run up to $389.80 a month for high earners] while the average enrollment fee for Part D, Medicare's prescription drug plan, is $35.63. There are also hefty hospital deductibles: $1,288 for the first 60 days, and between $322 and $644 a day for each additional 24 hours.

These are significant sums, Kaufman says. Still, when he hears Republican lawmakers denounce Medicare and propose reducing benefits, he becomes livid and cites a statistic he saw on the website of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. Already, he reports, 45 percent of retirees spend more than one-third of their Social Security benefits on health care, from co-pays for care, to premiums, deductibles and out-of-pocket fees for services -- such as going to the eye doctor, dentist or audiologist -- that are not provided. "We should be on the offensive, pushing for something better," he says. "What we need is a single payer or socialized health care system."

Republican-Initiated Cuts Likely

Needless to say, the Trump administration seems disinclined to consider either of these options and although we do not yet know exactly what the Republican-controlled Congress has in mind, they have indicated that the repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and changes to Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security are high on their agenda. "It's a sequencing thing," says Alex Lawson, executive director of Social Security Works. "They'll first go after Medicaid, then Medicare, and then Social Security."

Let's start with Medicaid, a health insurance program meant to benefit the poorest US residents. After passage of the Affordable Care Act, 31 states and the District of Columbia expanded Medicaid eligibility -- some locales allowed people with incomes up to 200 percent of the federal poverty guidelines to gain access to coverage. This has provided health insurance to 20 million previously uninsured people, including many children, and increased the total number of people on Medicaid to 74 million. Newly installed head of Health and Human Services, Tom Price, has proposed rescinding their coverage by repealing the ACA, a move that will save the feds an estimated $500 billion a year. In its place, Price wants Medicaid to become part of a block grant program, a proposal that advocates for seniors and people with disabilities say will be a disaster. David Certner, legislative counsel to AARP, notes that block grants are typically small, so that in the event of an economic downturn or emergency health crisis, states will be left scrambling for revenue to fund necessary services.

Max Richtman, CEO and president of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare, notes that it's not a coincidence that the Trump administration has targeted Medicaid first, since most recipients are youth or people with low incomes. "There is not a strong constituency protecting it," he says.

This is worrisome to Joshua Grey, a disabled 58-year-old New York City resident. Grey contends with post-traumatic stress disorder and chronic depression; he is also HIV positive. But thanks to a patchwork of care provided by Medicaid, Medicare and the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP), he is able to get Truvada, an effective, but exorbitantly expensive, HIV medication. "I receive $1,300 and change each month from Social Security and pay $840 in rent. Every three months I'm required to pay $518 toward my drug costs, and then Medicaid picks up the balance of $1,600 a month so I can get the Truvada," Grey explains.

Like Michael Kaufman, Grey finds the layers of bureaucracy frustrating, but knows that he has no choice but to cope. "As it is now, everything is tenuous," he continues. "There is not much of a margin. I walk on eggshells since my money is really limited. I describe my life as a quilt that is not well sewn and can easily fray. If there are cuts to any of the programs I rely on, I will literally starve."

Thousands of recipients echo Grey's fears. Some rely on Medicaid alone, while 10 million, like Grey, are dually eligible for both Medicaid and Medicare. They, of course, are the most vulnerable group, should cuts be enacted.

Massive Cuts Threatened

Republican Sam Johnson of Texas has proposed raising the eligibility age for Medicare from 65 to 67, a shift that could leave 1.9 million 65-and-66-year-olds uninsured unless they qualify for Medicaid, are still working and have job-related coverage, have a spouse who can get a policy for the entire family, or have the funds to purchase a private insurance plan.

"Before we won Medicare in 1965, elderly people had to go out and try to buy health insurance policies on their own," says Max Richtman. "It didn't work because the companies did not want to sell affordable policies to older people. Now the Republicans are proposing giving seniors a voucher -- we call it coupon care -- to help them defray the cost of buying a health insurance plan. The message is 'good luck, you're on your own.' People will fall through the cracks."

At its core, he continues, the proposed change rests on a fundamental belief that the federal government should be solely concerned with trade, commerce and national security and should pay no mind to people's need for such basics as food, shelter, economic security, education or clean water and air.

This message has a champion in House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) who calls both Medicare and Social Security "liabilities" and "empty promises."  As is readily apparent, Ryan's characterizations are music to Trump supporters' ears. Additionally, a proposal to raise the Social Security retirement age to 69 is also being bandied about and is being cheered on by Ryan and company. If the plan goes through, it will have a particularly harsh impact on the 10,000 Baby Boomers who turn 65 each and every day. The poorest of them, typically people of color and/or LGBTQ people, will suffer most.

"Ending Social Security and Medicare are Paul Ryan's reasons for living," says Alex Lawson of Social Security Works. "Under the cover of chaos caused by Trump, Ryan has the ability to ram deeply unpopular policies, including the destruction of Medicare and Medicaid, through Congress."

Aren't the elected officials who support these cuts worried about being defeated in the next election? I ask. "Ryan and a lot of other Congress members are already auditioning for their next job," Lawson replies. "They'll cash out from Congress and go on to make millions because the insurance companies will rush to hire them. Why? Precisely because they destroyed Medicaid and Medicare. Plus, the crueler the policy is, the more invitations they get to appear on Fox News."

Resistance Is Brewing

As the threat of vanishing health care becomes ever more dire, large numbers of people are mobilizing around the country to both protect the Affordable Care Act and advocate for a single-payer system.  And, while collective resistance is brewing, tens of thousands of people are finding alternative avenues for a quieter, but nonetheless effective, form of individually driven resistance.

Pat Mitchell, for one, is an Alabama-based retiree and Medicare recipient who uses a website called canadadrugs.com to purchase her medication. "My co-pay in the US for a 90-day supply of the drug I need to take would be $1,568," she told Truthout. "Using the canadadrugs website, the same supply costs $324. This is the only medicine I can tolerate, and I've been getting it from Canada for the past seven or eight years. The US does not try to negotiate prices for medicine. It's wrong. I have friends who take half a pill a day or take their meds every other day due to the prohibitive costs. I can't do this. If I don't take my medication as prescribed, I have flare ups and end up in the hospital."

While Mitchell is grateful to our northern neighbor for making her treatment affordable, she is also supportive of efforts to expand Medicare, protect Medicaid and improve Social Security benefits for the disabled and elderly. Furthermore, she hopes that Trump can be pushed to make good on his campaign promise to protect Social Security and Medicare benefits.

"Trump very clearly understands the popularity of these programs to people, many of whom voted for him," AARP's David Certner says. "As far as we can tell, he has not changed his mind on this, but that can change. We know that the House and Senate will begin the budget reconciliation process sometime this month. Policy changes can't be made during reconciliation; only spending provisions can be altered, but they need only 50 votes to take effect."

Vigilance Is Key

"Medicare is the part of our health system that works," Alex Lawson of Social Security Works stresses. "We not only have to protect it, we have to expand it. We can start by lowering the age of general eligibility from 65 to 62. We should also allow Medicare to negotiate with Pharma over drug prices. We should be putting patents, not patients, at risk."

Lawson knows that making headway on these demands will require hard work and a concerted campaign to counter a now-ascendant right wing that hates the idea of government-supported social welfare programs. A well-coordinated 82-year campaign against Social Security and a 52-year campaign against Medicare -- coordinated primarily by Pete Peterson's Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, the Koch brothers and the Heritage Foundation -- has impacted Congress and is believed by many Americans, he told Truthout. "The message that the market is the solution has been repeated over and over again. It's part of a straight-up marketing campaign that has gotten a fair amount of traction thanks to the endless repetition. It's now up to us to repeatedly call it what it is -- a total lie."

Originally published at truth-out.org


Jan/Feb 2017 Newsletter
Jan 24, 2017

Brothers and Sisters,

First off, let me wish everyone a Happy New Year!

The Christmas party was a smash hit. We had a fantastic turnout of 246 people. The food was awesome and the hall nicely decorated for the holidays. A special thanks to the executive committee for doing another spectacular job. Thanks to Mike Krainer and his crew who ran the money wheel. Thanks to Tommy Madkins for running the cake wheel. It takes a lot of time and volunteers to make these parties the success that they are. A special thanks goes out to all of you who brought the baked goods for the cake wheel. Winner of the 50/50 was George Booker who donated $100 back to the Retirees Club.

In appreciation, retirees club presents Local 355 with very large gift
  The Local 355 Association of Retired Members (A.R.M.) made a surprise presentation of a state-of-the-art television to the union during its monthly meeting Thursday, Jan. 20, at the Baltimore hall.  

  The Vizio SmartCast E-Series 70” Class Ultra HD Home Theater Display will replace the rarely-used, dated TV currently in the members meeting hall. “Our Retiree Bowling League wanted to do something special to show our sincere appreciation for everything Local 355 does for us,” said Bob Eney, president of the club.

  “It really is amazing,” Secretary-Treasurer Dave White said about the generous gift. “These guys take nothing for granted here; they are always giving back. We’ve worked with them for years and they were like part of the family. That connection continues today.” White said he looks forward to putting the high-tech TV to good use. “The IBT produces excellent training and organizing videos that we’ll now be able to share with our members and stewards.”  

   A picture of this presentation and pictures from the Christmas Party and an announcement of Amports East looking for new employees can be found at  www.teamsters355.com.

  Congratulations to Triple Crown Winners:
    Rich Parker, Betty AnnBarr and Dan Wachter.

  FYI - Check this out: For those of you that have a computer, go to google.com and type in "Do a barrel roll." Watch your screen.

  A special thanks to Attorney James E. Garland of the Peter G. Angelos Law Offices for his generous donation of Baltimore Orioles merchandise which will be raffled off at upcoming retirees' meetings.

  Remember, we can always use new bowlers!

  New Members:
  James Sank (Md. State Hwy Admin), Ed Death (Sunpapers), Robert Small (UPS), Wes McClung (Penske), Ann Green (Hobelmann Amports), Gary Wurzbacher (Sunpapers), and Joe Bell (US Foods).
 

  Sick Members: 
  Ernest
Boritz, John Braxton, Joe Gardner, Tyron Howard and John Mayola

  Deceased Member:
  Preston Adcock (Penske Transp. Serv.), David Nelson (UPS), and Donald
Winaker (St. Johnsbury Trucking)

  Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

  The next meetings will be on February 16 and March 16 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.  

Fraternally,

Bob Eney
President


Alliance for Retired Americans leader statement on Tom Price
Jan 24, 2017
Statement of Retiree Leader Richard Fiesta on
Confirmation Hearings of Mick Mulvaney and Tom Price

The following statement was issued by Richard Fiesta, Executive Director of the Alliance for Retired Americans, as Trump cabinet nominee Tom Price testifies in the Finance Committee and Mick Mulvaney testifies in the Senate Budget and Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committees.

Retirees are rightly terrified by the prospect of Tom Price being the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services and Mick Mulvaney directing the Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Rep. Mulvaney has earned a lifetime pro-retiree score of just 6% on the Alliance’s Congressional Voting Record.

In May 2009, Rep. Mulvaney voted in the South Carolina State Senate for an amendment declaring Social Security and Medicaid unconstitutional. In May 2011, he said that Paul Ryan’s plan needed to go farther because it did not cut Social Security and Medicare ‘rapidly enough.’ That same year, Mulvaney told MSNBC that Social Security was a ‘Ponzi scheme’ that might not be able to provide assistance to people in the years to come. He even failed to pay Social Security and Medicare withholding taxes for a domestic worker, violating the law everyone else must follow and disrespecting the very system he wants to oversee.

Today he pledged to push President Trump to raise the Social Security retirement age beyond 67.

Rep. Price has earned a lifetime pro-retiree score of just 4% on the Alliance’s Congressional Voting Record. He has pledged to replace guaranteed earned Medicare benefits with a system of ‘coupon-care’ and vouchers that will cost retirees more out of pocket.

Both nominees have made statements about the need to ‘reform’ Medicare and Social Security, including supporting or proposing privatization and raising the retirement age. These are in direct conflict with President Trump’s repeated promises not to cut Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.

These nominees should not be confirmed to these positions. And President Trump must keep his campaign promise and promise to veto any bills that cut Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid.
Christmas Party 2016
Dec 16, 2016

Dec. 16, 2016

Continued from main page

Teamster retirees’ annual Christmas party another festive event

... “Retirees who have come from other locals have said that ours is one of the best to be involved with.”

In addition to the annual Christmas party, A.R.M.  has a bowling league, and hosts an annual bowling banquet and a summer party for its members.

The organization has a core group of members who meet at the Baltimore hall every Tuesday to share stories, talk labor and politics, assist with building maintenance and offer support to the officers and staff in whatever way they can. A.R.M.’s monthly meeting is held every third Thursday of the month except August and December, and averages 60 or more attendees.

View more photos here...


Alliance for Retired Americans launch campaign to protect Medicare from privatization
Dec 07, 2016

Speaker Paul Ryan and Rep. Tom Price, whom President-elect Trump will nominate to be Secretary of Health and Human Services, both said that they were moving to “reform” Medicare in the next Congress.

Alliance members will be directly lobbying members of Congress and Senators in Washington and in their home districts. The Alliance will also campaign online and feature dozens of personal stories about why Medicare’s guaranteed benefits are so important on its website, https://retiredamericans.org, and social media.

“Our members are irate. They paid into the Medicare system for decades, and heard President-elect Trump repeatedly promise to protect their earned health care benefits. We will fight tooth and nail to protect Medicare from those who try to turn the earned benefits of Medicare into Coupon-care,” said Richard Fiesta, executive director of the Alliance.

12/7/16


As aging population increases, elders and allies fight for social supports
Nov 01, 2016
Nov. 1, 2016  | … There is no one-size-fits-all strategies to ensure healthy and productive aging since different people want different things. Some want to remain in their homes, no matter what, while others prefer facilities that offer meals, planned activities and opportunities for socialization. Some want to retire at the first possible moment while others want to — or often must — work until they are unable to do so. Some want routine contact with diverse groups of people, while a different cohort wants to live exclusively with age-mates. So what to do?… truth-out.org
Nov/Dec. 2015 Newsletter
Nov 06, 2015

Brothers and Sisters,

Once again it is hard to believe that Thanksgiving and Christmas are right around the corner.

Dates of interest:  

  • Sunday, November 1, is when we turn our clocks back an hour.
  • Thursday, November 26, is Thanksgiving Day.
  • Friday, November 27, is the dreaded Black Friday.
  • Monday, December 7, is Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.
  • Monday, December 7, is the cut off date for your envelopes to be sent in for the Christmas Party.
  • Thursday, December 17, is our Christmas Party.
  • Friday, December 25, is Christmas Day.
  • Wednesday, November 11, is Veterans Day. 

    To all of our veterans, a special thank you for serving our country. To those of you who have family members serving in the Armed Forces, tell them they are being thought of every day by all of us, and thanks a million.  Go to www.militarywallet.com for information. Click on discount for free meals and discounts.

   There is a granite monument in Westminster, MD, that reads: "This monument is dedicated to mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, wives, husbands, sons, daughters, lovers, friends and most of all dreams of the men and women from Carroll County who risked it all in Vietnam." You can also substitute WWI, WWII, Korea, Desert Storm and other conflicts.    

Reminders:

  • For bowlers, if Anne Arundel County schools are closed due to weather, then there is no bowling. If schools are just 2 hours late, then we bowl.
  • For retiree meetings, if Baltimore City schools are closed due to weather, then there is no meeting.  If schools are 2 hours late, then we have a meeting.
  • For the Christmas party, if Baltimore City schools are closed, then there will be no party. If schools are 2 hours late, then we will have the party.
  • Remember to update the Union Hall with new telephone numbers and address changes.

   The hall for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Oldham Street. It's near the corner of South Oldham Street and O’Donnell Street, right behind the BP station. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O’Donnell Street exit of Route 895 (old tunnel).

The Christmas party will be held on Thursday, December 17. 

   There are some changes that have been made: (1) The hours for the parties are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (instead of noon to 4 p.m.), and (2) NO ONE will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the start of the party.  

   Start getting your envelopes in. Remember that your check should be $25 if one person and $50 if 2 people. You will get your check back at the party. They have to be received by Monday, December 7. There will be a cake wheel and a money wheel. We need volunteers for both of the wheels. Please bring cakes for the cake wheel; thank you in advance.

MENU

Steamed Shrimp

Top Round Beef on the Pit

Sweet Italian Sausage on the Pit

Homemade Maryland Crab Soup

Shrimp Creole

Creamy Whipped Garlic & Parsley Potatoes

BBQ Chicken

Sweet Corn Casserole

Sauerkraut & Kielbasa

Greek Salad with Fresh Feta

Homemade Pasta Salad

Assorted Cheese Platters

Chips & Pretzels

Assortment of Breads & Rolls for the Pit items

All Fixin’s & Condiments

Assorted Sheet cakes

Draft Beer (2) Selections (Budweiser & Miller Light)

Non-alcoholic beer

Soda~Coffee~Ice Tea~Lemonade

New Members: Ciro Pistorio, Wayne Teter, Joe Smith, Russell Brady, Robert Warren, Donald Watson, Tom Duncan, Charles Holmes. 

Sick Members: Eugene Chamberlin, Taylor Howard

Deceased Members: Jimmie Pease (Allied Systems), Milton Stapf (Mountainside), Bob Hayward (Mountainside), James McRae (Sysco).

Remember to keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

  The next meeting will be on Thursday, November 19, 2015, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Remember, there will be no meeting in December due to the Christmas party. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m., the Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the General Meeting begins at 11 a.m.  A light lunch is served following the General Meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally

Bob Eney

President


Sept/Oct. 2015 Newsletter
Sep 03, 2015

Brothers and Sisters:

Bowling started on August 26th. We can always use more bowlers.

The Golf Tournament will be on Saturday, September 12th, at Eisenhower Golf Course in Crownsville, MD. You need to register by Sept 4th. Call the hall for details.

A Motorcycle Run is scheduled for Saturday, September 19th, with a registration cutoff of September 17th. Call the hall for details.

The summer party was great as always. We had 260 signed up for the party. A very special thanks to all of the volunteers.  Congratulations to Danny Williams, who won the 50/50 and donated a nice amount back to the club. Speaking of Brother Danny Williams, he made 10 gallons of delicious crab soup for our July retirees' meeting. (He was reimbursed for his expenses.) If you'd like to make or purchase something for our upcoming retirees' meeting, please let us know in advance.

On September 13th, monthly Sunday Union meetings begin. On September 11th, "never forget" the tragic event that happened 14 years ago

Labor Day Celebration:

The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public "the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations" of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.    

The character of the Labor Day celebration has undergone a change in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television.

The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pay tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation's strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.

Retail Sales Day:

To take advantage of large numbers of potential customers free to shop, Labor Day has become an important sale weekend for many retailers in the United States. Some retailers claim it is one of the largest sale dates of the year, second only to the Christmas season's Black Friday.  

Ironically, because of the importance of the sale weekend, some of those who are employed in the retail sector not only work on Labor Day, but work longer hours.  More Americans work in the retail industry than any other, with retail employment making up 24% of all jobs in the United States. As of 2012, only 3% of those employed in the retail sector were members of a labor union.

In high society, Labor Day is (or was) considered the last day of the year when it is fashionable to wear white or seersucker

 "Buy American!" might sound like nothing more than a slogan advanced by American manufacturers to sell products made in the USA, but the truth is that there are many reasons to consider buying American-made clothing, American-made toys, and other US-manufactured goods. We've listed just a few of the benefits of buying American below.

Top Ten Reasons to Buy USA Made Products:

10) Foreign labor standards allow unsafe worker conditions in many countries. When you buy American you not only support American manufacturers but also American workers, safe working conditions, and child labor laws.

9) Jobs shipped abroad almost never return. When you buy goods made in the USA, you help keep the American economy growing.

8) US manufacturing processes are much cleaner for the environment than many other countries; many brands sold here are produced in countries using dangerous, heavily polluting processes. When you purchase American-made products, you know that you're helping to keep the world a little cleaner for your children.

7) Many countries have no minimum wage restrictions, or the minimum wage is outrageously low. When you choose products made in the USA, you contribute to the payment of an honest day's wages for an honest day's work.

6) The growing lack of USA ability to manufacture many products is strategically unsound. When you seek out American-made goods, you foster American independence.

5) The huge US trade deficit leads to massive, unsustainable borrowing from other countries. Debt isn't good for you and it isn't good for America.

4) Foreign product safety standards are low. For example, poisonous levels of lead are in tens of millions of toys shipped to the USA. When you buy toys and other goods made in the USA, you can be confident that American consumer protection laws and safety standards are in place to protect your family.

3) Lack of minimum wage, worker safety, or environmental pollution controls in many countries undermines the concept of "fair and free trade". No Western nation can ultimately compete on price with a country willing to massively exploit and pollute its own people. When you buy only American-made products, you insist on a higher standard.

2) Factories and money are shifting to countries not friendly to the USA or democracy. When you avoid imported goods in favor of American-made items, you help ensure that the United States doesn't find its access to vital goods impacted by political conflict.

1) As the US manufacturing ability fades, future generations of US citizens will be unable to find relevant jobs. Buy American and help keep your friends and neighbors-and even yourself-earning a living wage.

Remember to "Buy Union" and "Buy American"

New Members: Tom Duncan, Donald Watson and Patrick Stowars            

Sick Members: Nat Dowell, Eugene Chamberlin and Jimmie Pease 

Deceased Members:  Milton Stapf (Mountainside)      

Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meetings will be on September 17th and October 15th in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD.  Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m.

The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m.  A light lunch is served following the general meeting.  Hope to see you there.  Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney

President


May/June 2015 Newsletter
May 18, 2015

Brothers and Sisters:

May is here in all its glory with Mother's Day on May 10th, and Armed Forces Day on May 16th. This is a day to pay tribute to men and women who serve in the United States Armed Forces. At the end of the month, on May 25th, we celebrate Memorial Day, a day of remembrance for those who have died serving our country. 

As always, the retirees held the cookout for Local 355's Baltimore general membership meeting Sunday, May 3rd.

Also in May, we had the bowling banquet on the 13th (bowlers only), and will have the retirees meeting on the 21st.

In June, the 13th is the date for the spring golf outing at Hog Neck Golf Course in Easton, MD. Please call the hall for more information. Flag Day is on the 14th, and Father’s Day and the first day of summer both fall on June 21st.

Bowling is over for the year and will resume again in the fall. A special thanks goes out to Joe Reichert, Mike Brett and Mel Holden for doing an outstanding job running the bowling league. Click here to see the photos.

A very special thanks to all of the volunteers who helped with the cookout at the general meeting. Our team of cooks, led by the head chef Rich Parker and his 2 sous chefs Bradley Schmidt and Joe Skiratko, hung in there all day!

As you know, we changed our 3,2,1 format this year. Instead of $300, $200 and $100 prizes we raised it to $1000, $500 and $250, The winners (all retirees) were Donald Spencer, Will Sank and Dan Molino. The majority of these tickets were sold at the general meetings. Brothers Mel Holden and Joe Reichert did an awesome job in selling these tickets. Thanks, gentlemen!

Charlie Stevens will take over the duties as Sargent of Arms from Mike Krainer. Mike is now one of our trustees.

Here is something to think about as we observe Memorial Day: All Americans should be given this lesson. Those who think that America is an arrogant nation should really reconsider that thought. Our founding fathers used God's words and teachings to establish our Great Nation and I think it's high time Americans get re-educated about this Nation's history. Pass it along and be proud of the country we live in and even more proud of those who serve to protect our God-given rights and freedoms.

I hope you take the time to read this and understand what the flag draped coffin really means. Here is how to understand the flag that laid upon it and is surrendered to so many widows and widowers.

Meaning of Flag Draped Coffin
Do you know that at military funerals, the 21-gun salute stands for the sum of the numbers in the year 1776?

Have you ever noticed the honor guard pays meticulous attention to correctly folding the United States of America Flag 13 times? You probably thought it was to symbolize the original 13 colonies, but we learn something new every day!

  • The 1st fold of the flag is a symbol of life.
  • The 2nd fold is a symbol of the belief in eternal life.
  • The 3rd fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veterans departing the ranks who gave a portion of their lives for the defense of the country to attain peace throughout the world.
  • The 4th fold represents the weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in time of war for His divine guidance.
  • The 5th fold is a tribute to the country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, 'Our Country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong.'
  • The 6th fold is for where people's hearts lie. It is with their heart that they pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.
  • The 7th fold is a tribute to its Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that they protect their country and their flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of their republic.
  • The 8th fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day.
  • The 9th fold is a tribute to womanhood, and mothers. For it has been through their faith, their love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great has been molded.
  • The 10th fold is a tribute to the father, for he too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of their country since they were first born.
  • The 11th fold represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon and glorifies in the Hebrews eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.
  • The 12th fold represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in the Christians eyes, God the Father, the Son and Holy Spirit.
  • The 13th fold, or when the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost reminding them of their Nations motto,  'In God We Trust.'

After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, ever reminding us of the soldiers who served under General George Washington, and the sailors and Marines who served under Captain John Paul Jones, who were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the Armed Forces of the United States, preserving for them the rights, privileges and freedoms they enjoy today.

There are some traditions and ways of doing things that have deep meaning. In the future, you'll see flags folded and now you will know why. Share this with the children you love and all others who love what is referred to, the symbol of ' Liberty and Freedom.'

New Members: Dennis McLaughin
Sick Members: Lester Evans, Milton Staph
Deceased Members: Samuel Patterson (Mountainside); Donald Wetherbee (Kane); Donald Spencer (New Penn)
.

Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meetings will be on May 21th and June 18th in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.
 
Fraternally,
Bob Eney, President


March/April 2015 Newsletter
Mar 12, 2015

Brothers and Sisters:

I know that some of you snow lovers don’t care for it, but it has been a semi nice winter as far as I am concerned. Not as much snow as last year, but much colder.

Don’t forget that Daylight Saving Time begins March 8th (this is when you set your clocks forward). St. Paddy’s day is March 17th, and the first day of Spring (yea!) is March 20th. In Apri,l we have Easter on the 5th. Opening day for the Orioles is on April 6th. Then there's that dreaded tax day – this year it's April 15.

FYI! Check out this website for union-made products: www.unionlabel.com and remember to Buy USA

E-Mail Tracker Programs – very interesting and a must read!

   The man that sent this information is a computer tech. He spends a lot of time clearing the junk off computers for people and listens to complaints about speed. All forwards are not bad, just some. Be sure you read the very last paragraph. He wrote:

  "By now, I suspect everyone is familiar with snopes.com and/or truthorfiction.com for determining whether information received via email is just that: true/false or fact/fiction. Both are excellent sites. Here's advice from snopes.com:

   1. Any time you see an email that says "forward this on to 10 (or however many) of your friends," "sign this petition," or "you'll get bad luck" or "you'll get good luck" or "you'll see something funny on your screen after you send it" or whatever – it almost always has an email tracker program attached that tracks the cookies and emails of those folks you forward to.
   "The host sender is getting a copy each time it gets forwarded and then is able to get lists of active email addresses to use in SPAM emails or sell to other Spammers. Even when you get emails that demand you send the email on if you're not ashamed of God/Jesus – that is email tracking, and they are playing on our conscience. These people don't care how they get your email addresses - just as long as they get them.
   Also, emails that talk about a missing child or a child with an incurable disease "how would you feel if that was your child" - email tracking. Ignore them and don't participate!

   2. Almost all emails that ask you to add your name and forward on to others are similar to that mass letter years ago that asked people to send business cards to the little kid in Florida who wanted to break the Guinness Book of Records for the most cards. All it was, and all any of this type of email is, is a way to get names and 'cookie' tracking information for telemarketers and spammers - to validate active email accounts for their own profitable purposes.
   You can do your friends and family members a GREAT favor by sending this information to them. You will be providing a service to your friends. And you will be rewarded by not getting thousands of spam emails in the future! Do yourself a favor and STOP adding your name(s) to those types of listing regardless how inviting they might sound! Or make you feel guilty if you don't! It's all about getting email addresses and nothing more. You may think you are supporting a GREAT cause, but you are NOT! Instead, you will be getting tons of junk mail later and very possibly a virus attached!
   Plus, we are helping the spammers get rich! Let's not make it easy for them! Also: Email petitions are NOT acceptable to Congress of any other organization - i.e., Social security, etc. To be acceptable, petitions must have a signed signature and full address of the person signing the petition, so this is a waste of time and you are just helping the email trackers.
"

   There has been a change in our policy of sending in the envelopes for our two parties. Starting after this year's summer party on August 20, 2015, you will have to send in a new envelope for each party. You will be given back your envelopes. Brother Joe Reichert started taking the envelopes as a favor to all of us. But like all good things, this has to end mainly because of abuse from some of our members. We are sorry that we have to make this change. Remember, if you have an envelope in for the summer party, it is still okay to leave it. 

5 Tips for Keeping Your Knives Sharp:
   Dull knives can slow you down because they require more force to cut stuff. They’re also dangerous because they’re more likely to slip when slicing, putting your fingers at risk. Factory sharpening doesn’t last long, so it’s up to you to keep the edge sharp. Here’s how from the experts at Consumer Reports:
   Do hone. That smooth-looking edge on a chef’s knife, paring knife, and slicer actually has superfine teeth like a comb. When you chop straight down, they get messed up. Honing on a steel sharpening rod straightens them out again, restoring the edge.
   Don’t scrape. Avoid scraping the edge of the knife across your cutting board to scoop up chopped food; that dulls the knife. Use a pastry scraper for the job instead.
   Do use the right cutting board. Wooden cutting boards are the most forgiving; polyethylene is a close second. Cutting on a plate or other hard surface such as tile or glass will ruin the edge.
   Don’t put knives in the dishwasher. Even if the manufacturer says it’s okay, always hand-wash knives. Excessive heat and chemicals take their toll. Wash with soap and water, and dry immediately.
   Do store them right. Use a block or a wall-mounted magnetic strip. Avoid drawers, where edges can knock against each other or other kitchen implements.

New members: Everett Gray, Dwight Hill
Sick members: Joe Gardner, Lester Evans, Frank Barnett, Milt Stapf
Deceased members: None

   Remember to keep these members in your thoughts and prayers.

   The next meetings will be on March 19, 2015, and April 16, 2015, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m., the Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the General Meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the General Meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney
President
 


January/February 2015 Newsletter
Jan 16, 2015

Lots more photos of the Christmas Party are in the Photo Gallery.

Brothers and Sisters:
 
First off, let me wish everyone a Happy New Year!
 
   The Christmas party was a smash hit. We had a fantastic turnout of over 285 people. The food was awesome and the hall nicely decorated for the holidays. A special thanks to the executive committee for doing another spectacular job. A special thanks to Ronn and Lin Cain for again taking care of the basket of cheer this year. It was won by Lori Ratlief, pictured below left. Also, a special thanks to Cherry Brett and Ginger Townsley for selling the 50/50's. Donald Spencer, right, won the 50/50. Thanks to Mike Krainer and his crew who ran the money wheel. Thanks to Tommy Madkins for running the cake wheel. It takes a lot of time and volunteers to make these parties the success that they are. A big thanks to Charlie Long and his "Rubber Band" for putting on another good show. We also would like to thank our two guest band members, Suzanne Hollis and Erin Durange, who gave a great performance.

   Congratulations to Triple Crown Winners: John Adkinson, Joe Reichert, and Calvin Duley. This drawing was held at the regular union meeting in December. We are going to sell the Triple Crown Tickets differently this year. The tickets will cost $5 apiece, but the prize money will be a lot more. It will be $1000, $500, and $250 instead of $300, $200, and $100. 
 
Just a reminder on snow closings:
   Bowling: If Anne Arundel County schools are closed because of weather, then there will be no bowling.  If A.A. schools are delayed in opening 1 or 2 hours because of weather, then we will be bowling.

   ARM Meetings: If Baltimore City schools are closed because of weather, then there will be no meeting.  If Baltimore City schools are delayed 1 or 2 hours because of weather, then we will have our meeting.

Here's an easy recipe for these cold months:
Slow Cooker Chicken Philly Sandwiches
Makes 4-5 sandwiches
Ingredients
•    2 tablespoons butter
•    1 large sweet onion, sliced
•    2 green bell peppers, sliced
•    3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, sliced
•    2 tablespoons Dale's Steak Seasoning (found in most supermarkets)
•    sliced Mozzarella cheese
•    hoagie rolls
Instructions
Spray a 3 - 4 quart slow cooker with non-stick cooking spray and turn to LOW heat.
Add butter, onions and green peppers.
Toss chicken with steak seasoning, salt and pepper, then add to slow cooker.
Cover and cook for 5 hours.
Serve on hoagies with a slice of cheese melted on top.

   A special thanks to Attorney James E. Garland of the Peter G. Angelos Law Offices for his generous donation of Baltimore Orioles merchandise which will be raffled off at upcoming retirees' meetings.
 
   New Members: Bill Williams (ABF), Jerry Northam (U.S. Foods), Cleveland Pendergrass (Smelkinson Bros.), and Ralph Bets Jr. (Denver Post & Sunpapers).

   Sick Members: Ed Jackson, Milt Stapf, Bill Gibson and Francis Proctor.
   Deceased Members:  Bill Grossarth (UPS), Milt Marszalek (UPS), Walt Myers (Mountainside), Paul Anderson (Montgomery Wards) and Leroy Jones (Sunpapers).
   Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

   The next meetings will be on January 15 and February 19 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

   And remember, we can always use new bowlers!
 
Fraternally,
Bob Eney,
President

Photos/Teamsters Joint Council 62


Those Pension Cuts and What You Need to Know
Dec 16, 2014

Dec. 16, 2014  | AARP | Congress recently carved a hole in a 40-year-old pension law that has prevented employers from cutting benefits earned by those already retired. This change  applies to people covered under multiemployer plans that are in critical financial shape.

Here’s what you need to know:

What is a multiemployer plan? This is a pension covering workers and retirees from more than one employer in the same or related industry, such as trucking or construction. (Most of them were established under collective bargaining between a union and the employers.) There are about 1,400 multiemployer plans with 10.4 million participants. Most workers with traditional pensions are in a single-employer plan, meaning it covers workers from only one employer.

Why are lawmakers doing this? The federal Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp., which insures these pensions, says that some 10 percent of multiemployer plans – covering about 1.5 million people – are in such financial trouble that they are likely to become insolvent. PBGC estimated that its fund insuring multiemployer plans will likely run out of money in eight to 10 years unless changes are made. Some lawmakers argued that these distressed plans need the ability to cut retirees’ benefits so pensions can survive longer.

AARP and other consumer advocates argue that these pensions aren’t in immediate danger of insolvency so there is no need to rush this drastic measure without considering alternatives, such as scaling back on optional benefits in a plan or providing PBGC with greater funds and the authority to intervene earlier. Advocates also worry this move by lawmakers might someday open the door to similar pension cuts to other plans.

How do I know if my pension is in financial trouble? Under a 2006 pension law, plans are required to notify participants if they are significantly underfunded. The U.S. Department of Labor also posts a list online of plans whose status is considered “critical” or “endangered.”

Will everyone in a distressed plan experience cuts? It’s up to plan trustees to decide how much to cut benefits, though the legislation offers certain restrictions. For instance, benefits cannot be cut for retirees age 80 and older or those receiving a disability pension. And those under age 75 would see bigger cuts than retirees at ages 75 to 79, whose benefits could be slashed but not as much.

How big are the cuts? Some retirees could see their benefits cut by more than 60 percent. The Pension Rights Center, an advocacy group, provides an online calculator to figure any potential benefit loss under the legislation for those under age 75.

Do retirees or workers get any say in these cuts? Participants will get to vote on any proposed pension cuts. Yet as the Pension Rights Center points out, this right is “illusory.” A majority of all participants – all employees and retirees, not just those voting – must reject the cuts, the group says. And ballots can be sent via email, a hurdle for those without Internet access. Yet even if participants overwhelmingly reject cuts, their vote can be simply set aside if the troubled plan may jeopardize the financial health of the PBGC, the group says.

When will this take effect? The pension provisions take effect beginning in 2015.


November/December Newsletter 2014
Nov 13, 2014

November/December 2014

Brothers and Sisters,

Hard to believe that Thanksgiving and Christmas are right around the corner.

Dates of Interest 

Tuesday November 11: Veterans Day. 

    To all of our veterans, a special thank you for serving our country. To those of you who have family members serving in the Armed Forces, tell them they are being thought of every day by all of us, and thanks a million. Go to www.militarywallet.com for information on free meals and discounts.

Thursday, November 27: Thanksgiving Day

Friday, November 28: The dreaded Black Friday

Sunday, December 7: Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day

Monday, December 8: The cutoff date for your envelopes to be sent in for the Christmas Party

Thursday, December 18: Our Christmas Party

Thursday, December 25: Christmas Day

_____________________________

A Brief History of Veterans Day

Veterans Day, formerly known as Armistice Day, was originally set as a U.S. legal holiday to honor the end of World War I, which officially took place on November 11, 1918. In legislation that was passed in 1938, November 11 was "dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be hereafter celebrated and known as 'Armistice Day.'" As such, this new legal holiday honored World War I veterans.

In 1954, after having been through both World War II and the Korean War, the 83rd U.S. Congress -- at the urging of the veterans service organizations -- amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting the word "Veterans." With the approval of this legislation on June 1, 1954, Nov. 11 became a day to honor American veterans of all wars. In 1968, the Uniforms Holiday Bill ensured three-day weekends for federal employees by celebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. Under this bill, Veterans Day was moved to the last Monday of October. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holiday on its original date. The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on Oct. 25, 1971.

Finally on September 20, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed a law which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of Nov. 11, beginning in 1978. Since then, the Veterans Day holiday has been observed on Nov. 11.

The difference between Veterans Day and Memorial Day 

Memorial Day honors service members who died in service to their country or as a result of injuries incurred during battle.  Deceased veterans are also remembered on Veterans Day but the day is set aside to thank and honor living veterans who served honorably in the military - in wartime or peacetime.

_____________________________

The hall for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Oldham Street.  It's near the corner of South Oldham Street and O’Donnell Street, right behind the BP station.  The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O’Donnell Street exit of Route 895 (old tunnel).  The Christmas party will be held on Thursday, December 18. There are some changes that have been made: (1) The hours for the parties are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (instead of noon to 4 p.m.), and (2) No one will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the start of the party.

Start getting your envelopes in. Remember that your check should be $25 if one person and $50 if 2 people. You will get your check back at the party. They have to be received by Monday, December 8.  There will be a cake wheel and a money wheel. We need volunteers for both of the wheels.  Please bring cakes for the cake wheel; thank you in advance.

 ~ MENU ~

Steamed Shrimp

Top Round Beef on the Pit

Sweet Honey Ham on the Pit 

Sweet Italian Sausage on the Pit

 Homemade Maryland Crab Soup

Shrimp Creole

Creamy Whipped Garlic & Parsley Potatoes 

BBQ Chicken

 Sweet Corn Casserole

Sauerkraut & Kielbasa

Greek Salad with Fresh Feta

Homemade Pasta Salad

 Assorted Cheese Platters

Chips & Pretzels

Assortment of Breads & Rolls for the Pit items

All Fixin’s & Condiments

Assorted Sheet cakes ~ Coffee

Draft Beer (2) Selections (Budweiser & Miller Light)

Non alcoholic beer

Soda~Coffee~Ice Tea~Lemonade

New Members: Iran Jones

Sick Members: Bill Hicks, Bill Gibson, George Booker and Ray Bularz.

Deceased Member: Robert Kuhn, Sr. (Wilson Fright).

Remember to keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

   The next meeting will be on Thursday, November 20, 2014, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD.   Remember, there will be no meeting in December due to the Christmas party.  Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m., the Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the General Meeting begins at 11 a.m.  A light lunch is served following the General Meeting.  Hope to see you there.  Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney
President

 


September/October 2014 Newsletter
Sep 10, 2014

September/October 2014

Brothers and Sisters:

I hope that you all had a safe and happy Labor Day...

Bowling started on August 27th. We can always use more bowlers.

The Fall Golf Outing will be Saturday, September 13th at Eisenhower Golf Course; 1576 Generals Hwy; Crownsville, MD 21032. Please register with the hall before September 5th.

The 16th Annual Motorcycle Run will be held on Saturday, September 27th at 9 A.M. The ride will be to Washington Monument State Park near Boonsboro, MD. Call the hall to register.

The summer party was great as always. A very special thanks to all of the volunteers. Congratulations to Connie Zartman (right) for winning the 50/50 and donating a nice amount back to the club.

Some things occurred at the Summer Party that have to be addressed.

  • We turned away a nice young couple that wanted to attend because our member could not. These parties are for retired members that belong to the retirees club. These parties are for you and a guest only. Don't send someone in your place if you cannot attend. If a member passes away then their family and friends are no longer eligible to attend.
  • Some of the envelopes that we received did not contain checks. One had a deposit slip and another contain a blank slip of paper about the size of a check.
  • If you did not attend and did not give us advanced notice then we will cash your check. So when you check your bank statement and find out your check has been cashed, you will have to send us another check for future parties. The reason for the cut-off date is so that we can notify the caterer. There will be no one allowed to pay after the cut-off date at the hall or at the door.

The hall for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Oldham Street. It’s near the corner of S. Oldham Street and O’Donnell Street, right behind the BP station and the next road from the Royal Farm Store. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O’Donnell Street exit of Route 895 (old tunnel).

The Christmas party will be December 18. Envelopes have to be in by December 9. There are some changes that have been made:

(1) The hours for the parties are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (instead of noon to 4 p.m.)
(2) NO ONE will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the beginning of the party.

Start sending your envelopes in. This is the party where you bring in cakes and pies for the cake wheel. We will also have a money wheel. The basket of cheer drawing will be held (we could use more donations; you can drop them off at the hall).

Our vice-president Joe Reichert just had major surgery where they removed one-third of his colon. The doctor said that he believes that he removed all of the cancer that was there. He has a long road to recovery. Brother Joe said that if he would not have had a simple colonoscopy done that he would not be here today. So the Executive Board, Brother Joe and myself strongly urge you to get this procedure done ASAP.

New Members: Miles Anthony III, Roy Beckeridge
Sick Members: Joe Reichert, Cephas Hall
Deceased Members: Gerald Kraft (Leaseway), Milton Amos (Sun Paper), George Briemann (EI Lane), Francis Horn (Mountainside), Michael Lingenfelder (News American)
Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meetings will be on September 18 and October 16 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney,
President


2014 Summer Party
Sep 04, 2014

The Association of Retired Members held their Summer Party August 21, 2014 at the UAW Hall in Baltimore. Photos are available for viewing here. – Photos/Teamsters Joint Council 62


May/June 2014 Newsletter
Jul 21, 2014

Brothers and Sisters:

May is here in all its glory with Mother's Day on May 11th, and Armed Forces Day is May 17th. This is a day to pay tribute to men and women who serve in the United States Armed Forces. At the end of the month, on May 26th, we celebrate Memorial Day--a day of remembrance for those who have died serving our country.

Also in May we will have the bowling banquet on the 14th(bowlers only) and retirees meeting on the 15th and as always the retirees will be doing a cook-out for the Sunday Union meeting on the 18th. We need volunteers, so if you can help please be at the hall around 08:30. May 31th is the date for the spring golf outing at Hog Neck Golf Course in Easton Md. Please call the hall for more information.

In June, Flag Day is on the 14th and Father’s Day is the 15th. and summer rolling in on June 21st.

Bowling is over for the year and will resume again in September. A special thanks goes out to Joe Reichet, Mike Brett and Mel Holden for doing a outstanding job running the bowling league.

We need adult beverages for the basket of cheer.

A very special thanks goes out to Jen Collins of Local 335 office staff who is retiring at the end of May. She has been an invaluable asset to all of the retirees and our executive board. We wish her well in her retirement.

FYI: If you’re confused about what those food expiration labels mean, you’re not alone. Most Americans are tossing safe and perfectly edible foods in the trash after looking at food “dates” that are vague at best.

You might be surprised to know that most food dating is voluntary, and not government mandated (except for infant formula and some baby foods), leading to a lot of variability in what these labels represent. Understanding what these terms actually mean will help extend your food budget and avoid waste, while also helping to avoid food spoilage.

Here are some popular labels for fresh (refrigerated) items that are the most confusing:

• Pack date simply means when the food was packaged and does not indicate freshness or shelf-life.
• Sell-by date is the last day a grocery store, or any retailer, can have the food on shelves for sale. Most foods, if stored properly, are safe to eat for up to several days or several months after this date, depending on the food (see below).
• Use-by or best if used by date means a food is safe to eat, with optimal taste, flavor, and freshness until this date when properly stored. It refers only to quality, not safety, and is not an index of spoilage.
• Guaranteed fresh by date usually refers to baked goods, and indicates optimal freshness. The products are still safe and edible beyond the date.

However, these dates don’t apply after you’ve opened the package. While hot dogs may have a "use by" date of three months ahead, once you've opened the package, you only have about a week to eat the rest. Food safety also extends to how and where you store your foods. Get a food thermometer to make sure foods are stored at 40 degrees or below. More perishable foods should be kept in the "meat drawer," which is usually the coldest section. It's OK to store condiments in the refrigerator door, but keep eggs, milk and yogurt in the main compartment for optimal freshness.

Here are a few guidelines:
• In the door: This is the least cold part of the fridge and is best for condiments, pickles, salad dressings and other foods with a high acid (think vinegar) content to resist bacterial growth.
• The coldest shelf: The middle of the fridge, sometimes also containing a separate meat drawer, is best for highly perishable foods like fish, deli meats, eggs or dairy.
• The middle/lower shelves: These are a great place for leftovers.
• Bottom drawers: The fruit and vegetable crispers maintain higher humidity, helping to preserve thin-skinned veggies like peppers, broccoli and leafy greens.

Here are USDA recommendations for food storage:

In the fridge:
• fresh meats: 1-2 days
• lunch meats: 3-5 days 
• hot dogs: 1 week opened
• salads: 3-5 days
• chicken, fish: 1-2 days
• hard cheese: 3-4 weeks
• milk: 5 days
• yogurt/sour cream: 7-10 days
• leftovers: 3-4 days

In the freezer:
• beef: 3-4 months
• soups/stews: 2-3 months  

• chicken: 9-12 months
• cheese: 6-9 months

Be sure to double wrap foods in plastic wrap to avoid “freezer burn,” which doesn’t affect food safety but creates an odd texture and reduces flavor. Remember that these are all approximate dates and will depend on optimal storage conditions including quick transport from the store to your home and refrigerating perishable items immediately after use. The "smell test" is not a reliable because food can still be contaminated without a bad odor. But remember, when in doubt, throw it out!

New Members: Carroll Miller, Bradley Schmidt and John Armstrong
Sick Members: Ron Cusick, Cephas Hall and Jimmy Hinton
Deceased Members: Douglas Largent (Penske), Ernest McNew (Penske) and Charles Rabuck (TLI)
Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meetings will be on May 15th and June 19th. in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,
Bob Eney,
President


Retirees gather, organize for social justice
Jun 18, 2014
June 18, 2014 LAS VEGAS - More than 500 retiree activists from across the country gathered in Las Vegas last month to discuss issues of social and economic justice at the annual membership convention of the Alliance for Retired Americans (ARA). The ARA has over 4.3 million members including retired union members and other retirees.
Bull Roast Benefit
May 28, 2014

FIRST ANNUAL BULL ROAST

to benefit Cuz We Care, Inc.*

Saturday, July 26, 2014

LaFontaine Bleue
7514 S. Ritchie Highway, Glen Burnie, Md., 21061

$40 per person
$15.50 4-12 years old (Under 4 - free)
Cut-off date for tickets is June 30th!

Raffles, Door Prizes, 50/50s, Money Wheel

Featuring live music by Swimmin' With Sharks and Last Call

Menu includes Roast Beef, Rotiserrie Chicken, Sausage w/Onions and Peppers, Pulled Pork, and More... Side Dishes and Desserts

Soda and Beer; Cash Bar Available

Tickets may be purchased through PayPal at ADMIN@CUZWECARE.NET
Sell 10 tickets, get the 10th one free!

Contact Stacy Connell at 410-519-7317
or Local 355 retiree Mike Brett at 410-590-5150

* All proceeds benefit Cux We Care, Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to providing financial assistance to families who have experienced the sudden loss of a child.


March/April Newsletter
Apr 09, 2014

Brothers and Sisters:

   Well, I guess it's safe to say that you are as fed up with this cold snowy Winter weather as I am. It's looking better as we are getting closer to good weather with Spring training underway and St. Paddy’s day on March 17th. Even the first day of Spring will be here on March 20th. With Easter on April 20th.
   The bowling banquet is to be held on May 14th at the Union Hall from 12:00 noon to 4:00 p.m. Remember this is for bowlers only.
   Ticket sales for the 3.2.1 are down. So please remember to turn yours in after you sell them and, if you can, please purchase some more. Thanks.
   We also need more donations of adult beverages for the basket of cheer.

WD-40: What IS The Main Ingredient of WD-40? 

   The "Water Displacement #40" product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and degreaser to protect missile parts. WD-40 was created in 1953, by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company. Its name comes from the project that was to find a 'Water Displacement' Compound.
   They were finally successful for a formulation–their fortieth attempt–thus WD-40. The Convair Companybought it in bulk to protect their atlas missile parts. Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you.

Uses for WD-40:
1. Protects silver from tarnishing.
2. Removes road tar and grime from cars.
3. Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.
4. Gives floor that 'just-waxed' sheen without making them slippery.
5. Keeps the flies off of Cows, Horses, and other Farm Critters, as well.
6. Restores and cleans chalkboards.
7. Removes lipstick stains.
8. Loosens stubborn zippers.
9. Untangles jewelry chains.
10. Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.
11. Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.
12. Keeps ceramic / terracotta garden pots from oxidizing.
13. Removes tomato stains from clothing.
14. Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots.
15. Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors.
16. Keeps scissors working smoothly.
17. Lubricates noisy door hinges on both home and vehicles doors.
18. It removes that nasty tar and scuff marks from the kitchen flooring. It doesn't seem to harm the finish and you won't have to scrub nearly as hard to get them off. Just remember to open some windows if you have alot of marks.
19. Removes those nasty bug guts that will eat away the finish on your car if not removed quickly!
20. Gives a children's playground gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.
21. Lubricates gearshift and mower deck lever fore ease of handling on riding mowers.
22. Rids kids' rocking chair and swings of squeaky noises.
23. Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.
24. Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.
25. Restores and cleans padded leather dash boards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers.
26. Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.
27. Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.
28. Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons, and bicycles for easy handling.
29. Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly.
30. Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools.
31. Removes grease splatters from stovetops.
32. Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.
33. Lubricates prosthetic limbs.
34. Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).
35. Removes all traces of duct tape.
36. Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve arthritis pain.
37. Florida's favorite: Cleans and removes love bugs from grills and bumpers. 38. The favorite use in the state of New York: It protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements.
39. WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a little on live bait or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time. Also, it's a lot cheaper than the chemical attractants that are made for just that purpose. Keep in mind though, using some chemical laced baits or lures for fishing are not allowed in some states.
40. Use it for fire ant bites. It takes the sting away immediately and stops the itch.
41. It is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray it on the marks and wipe with a clean rag.
42. Also, if you've discovered that your teenage daughter has washed and dried a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with WD-40and re-wash. Presto! The lipstick is gone!
43. If you spray it inside a wet distributor cap, it will displace the moisture, allowing the engine to start.
44. It removes the unwanted spray paint from vehicles.

As for that basic, main ingredient? It's FISH OIL!!

New Member: Clarence Newkirk
Sick Members: Jim Dvorack, Ron Cusick and Cephas Hall
Deceased Members: Manuel Encinas (Penske)
Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

Remember the Teamsters Local #355 website is www.teamsters355.com. The retirees have a link on the web page. Don’t forget to check out the photo links.

The March meeting will be held on Thursday, the 20th, and the April meeting on Thursday the 17th, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local Union #355, 1030 South Dukeland Street , Baltimore. Coffee and donuts are served starting at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10:00 a.m. The general meeting starts at 11:00 a.m. A light lunch will be served following the general meeting. Remember to bring another retired member with you to the meetings.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney,
President


January/February 2014 Newsletter
Jan 09, 2014

View more part photos here.

January/February 2014

Brothers and Sisters:

First off, let me wish everyone a Happy New Year !

The Christmas party was a smash hit. We had a fantastic turnout of over 260. The food was awesome and the hall nicely decorated for the holidays. A special thanks to the executive committee for doing another spectacular job. Special thanks to Ronn and Linda Cain for again taking care of the basket of cheer this year. It was won by Patti Bowen. Also a special thanks to Cherry Brett and Mel Holden for selling the 50/50's. Dan Molino was the winner, who in turn donated a very nice amount back to have another drawing that was won by Wayne Jordan. Thanks, Dan! Thanks to Mike Krainer and his crew who ran the money wheel. It takes a lot of time and volunteers to make these parties the success that they are. A big thanks to Charlie Long and his "Rubber Band" for putting on another good show.

Congratulations to Triple Crown Winners: Fay Duley; Laverne McMillion and Greg Bennett.  This drawing was held at the regular union meeting in December:  

Just a reminder on snow closings:

  • Bowling — If Anne Arundel County schools are closed because of weather, then there will be no bowling.  If A.A. schools are delayed in opening 1 or 2 hours because of weather, then we will be bowling.
  • ARM Meetings — If Baltimore City schools are closed because of weather, then there will be no meeting.  If Baltimore City schools are delayed 1 or 2 hours because of weather, then we will have our meeting.

A special thanks to Attorney James E. Garland of the Peter G. Angelos Law Offices for his generous donation of Baltimore Orioles merchandise which will be raffled off at upcoming retirees' meetings.

Remember, we always need bowlers!

As we still have many more cold days ahead, I would like to share one of my favorite recipes for some good comfort food. 

Ellen's White Chili  Serves 8 (at least)

Saute in large pot:

  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped

Add and bring to a boil:

  • 4 cooked chicken breasts, chopped in irregular pieces
  • 4 cups chicken broth (I use 4 bullion cubes and water)
  • 3 Tablespoons  jalapeno pepper, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 2 teaspoons oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper  

When above comes to boil, add beans and mushrooms. Simmer 20-30 minutes.

  • 4 14.5-oz cans great Northern beans, undrained
  • 1 can black, drained and rinsed, or pinto or black-eyed peas, undrained (for visual interest!)
  • 1 pkg. mushrooms, sliced (optional but it gives the flavors depth)

Serve topped with shredded Monterey Jack or Pepper Jack cheese.

Other ideas: Add white corn and less beans, thicken by mashing some of the beans, or top with sour cream, guacamole, tortilla chips, or chopped avocado (very yummy)

New Members: Patrick Mowray.

Sick Members:  Cephas Hall, Jim Dvorak, Jeff Butta, Wayne Chaney, Ron Cusick, John Mayola, George Grail

Deceased Members: Bob March (Esskay), John Cook (Penske), Chuck Devore (YRC), James Dize (Anchor Motor Fright) & Lonzo Ballard (Red Star).

Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meetings will be on January 16th and February 20 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney
President


November/December 2013 Newsletter
Nov 19, 2013

Brothers and Sisters,

Upcoming dates of Interest:

Monday, November 11, Veterans Day — To all of our veterans, a special thank you for serving our country. To those of you who have family members serving in the Armed Forces, tell them that they are being thought of every day by all of us, and thanks a million.  Go to www.militarywallet.com for information on free meals and discounts.


A Brief History of Veterans Day
Veterans Day, formerly known as Armistice Day, was originally set as a U.S. legal holiday to honor the end of World War I, which officially took place on November 11, 1918. In legislation that was passed in 1938, November 11 was "dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be hereafter celebrated and known as 'Armistice Day.'" As such, this new legal holiday honored World War I veterans. In 1954, after having been through both World War II and the Korean War, the 83rd U.S. Congress -- at the urging of the veterans service organizations -- amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting the word "Veterans." With the approval of this legislation on June 1, 1954, Nov. 11 became a day to honor American veterans of all wars. In 1968, the Uniforms Holiday Bill ensured three-day weekends for federal employees by celebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. Under this bill, Veterans Day was moved to the last Monday of October. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holiday on its original date. The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on Oct. 25, 1971. Finally on September 20, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed a law which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of Nov. 11, beginning in 1978. Since then, the Veterans Day holiday has been observed on Nov. 11.
 

The difference between Veterans Day and Memorial Day
Memorial Day honors service members who died in service to their country or as a result of injuries incurred during battle.  Deceased veterans are also remembered on Veterans Day but the day is set aside to thank and honor living veterans who served honorably in the military - in wartime or peacetime.
Friday November 22 — 50th Anniversary of the  Assassination of our 35th President, John F. Kennedy
I remember it well, as I was in the U.S. Navy, stationed at Bainbridge, MD, going to Radiomen School.  Do you remember where and what you were doing on this date in history?
Thursday, November 28 — Thanksgiving Day
Friday, November 29 — the dreaded Black Friday
Saturday, December 7 — Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. Amazing as it seems, this is not considered a federal holiday so schools, offices and businesses remain open and public transit continues to run. However, there are some organizations that may hold special events to commemorate those who were killed and/or injured at Pearl Harbor.
Monday, December 9 — Cut off date for your envelopes to be sent in for the Christmas Party
Thursday, December 19 — Christmas Party
Wednesday, December 25 — Christmas Day

   We believe in Union Made and Made in America products, so I thought that you should check out this website:   http://www.millionjobsproject.us/.

   Remember that the Summer party and the Christmas party are held on the 3rd Thursday of the month, just like the retirees meetings are. So when you get your new calendars for Christmas, mark the 3rd Thursday in August for the Summer party and the 3rd Thursday in December for the Christmas party. (That is, after you've looked at the pretty pictures!)
    The  hall for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Oldham Street. It's near the corner of South Oldham Street and O’Donnell Street, right behind the BP station. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O’Donnell Street exit of Route 895 (old tunnel). The Christmas Party will be held on December 19.
There are some changes that have been made: (1) The hours for the parties are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (instead of noon to 4 p.m.), and (2) NO ONE will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the start of the party.
   Start getting your envelopes in. Remember that your check should be $25 if one person and $50 if 2 people.  You will get your check back at the party. They have to be received by December 9. There will be a cake wheel and a money wheel. We need volunteers for both of the wheels. Please bring cakes for the cake wheel; thank you in advance.

MENU
Steamed Shrimp
Top Round Beef on the Pit
Sweet Honey Ham on the Pit
Sweet Italian Sausage on the Pit
Homemade Maryland Crab Soup
Shrimp Creole
Creamy Whipped Garlic & Parsley Potatoes
BBQ Chicken  Sweet Corn Casserole
Sauerkraut & Kielbasa
Greek Salad with Fresh Feta Cheese
Homemade Pasta Salad
Assorted Cheese Platters
Chips & Pretzels
Assortment of Breads & Rolls for the Pit items
All Fixin’s & Condiments
Assorted Sheet cakes ~ Coffee
Draft Beer (2) Selections (Budweiser & Miller Light)
Non alcoholic beer
Soda~Coffee~Ice Tea~Lemonade~Bottled Water


New Members: Rhodell Carter, Pat Mowray
Sick members: Wayne Chaney, Jeff  Butta, Frank Barnett, Ron Cusick, Cephas Hall
 Deceased members: John Weis, Don Shower                                        
              Remember to keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

   The next meeting will be on Nov, 21, 2013, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Remember, there will be no meeting in December due to the Christmas party. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m., the Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the General Meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the General Meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney,
President


How To Save Social Insurance (aka Entitlements)
Nov 15, 2013

Via Blog of the Century

November 13, 2013

As part of the deal to end the government shutdown, the House and Senate are now working together to come up with a joint budget — Medicare and Social Security are sure to be part of that discussion. Many progressives argue that benefits paid for by Americans throughout their whole working lives should not change, either by modifying cost-of-living increases, cutting benefits or raising the retirement age (which wouldn’t actually do much good for the budget).

However, there may be a way to ensure these programs have the funds to continue paying future beneficiaries without taking anything away from current retirees.

Capping Out
Anyone who earns a paycheck knows the Federal Insurance Contributions Act, or FICA tax, is deducted to pay for Social Security and Medicare. In 2013, 7.65 percent of your paycheck will go to those two programs (6.2 percent to Social Security, and the rest to Medicare). Businesses must also pay the same amount for each employee.

But these payroll taxes apply only to earnings of up to $113,700 a year, which is this year’s cap (it rises from year to year). Any earnings above that are not subject to FICA taxes. If you earn $227,400 in 2013, for example, you would only pay FICA taxes on half of that.

The median income in the United States in 2012 was just over $51,000, according to the Census Bureau. This means that more than half of Americans already pay FICA taxes on all of their income.

Raising or eliminating the payroll tax cap would not alter most paychecks at all—as few as 5 percent of Americans would pay more. Since most employees would see no change, employers would not have to pay much more either.

Raise It To Save It
According to the program’s trustees, Social Security’s trust funds will be exhausted in 2033, and Medicare’s in 2026. Some action is needed to prevent this from occurring—the question is what.

The idea of eliminating the cap isn’t new. The Congressional Research Service estimated subjecting all earnings to payroll taxes would keep Social Security solvent for another seventy-five years.

Still, it’s a difficult sell. After all, any tax increase is politically difficult. Luckily, the plan can be retooled to appeal to policymakers and even benefit most Americans.

Here’s how:

Eliminate The Cap . . .

For starters, the payroll tax cap should be repealed, making all income subject to FICA taxes. The downside, apart from some wealthier Americans having to pay more, would be that some businesses with higher-paid employees could also see their burdens rise, since employer contributions match those of employees.

That’s where the second part of the plan comes in.

. . . Then Cut The Rate
Before this year, the United States implemented a payroll tax “holiday,” cutting the Social Security rate for employees to 4.2 percent from its usual 6.2 percent. (Businesses did not see a rate cut.) The Tax Policy Center found that households earned, on average, an extra $900 to $1,000 a year because of that cut. Unfortunately, it expired this year, curbing consumer spending.

To win support for eliminating the cap, policymakers could include a second, temporary payroll tax cut. To sweeten the deal, businesses could also receive a temporary rate cut, allowing those with highly paid employees to keep their payments lower for a few years.

Greater Good
It’s worth noting that cutting the Social Security rate to 4.2 percent would not only benefit the 95 percent of Americans who already pay FICA taxes on all of their income, but also many Americans who would have to pay taxes on more income.

For example, someone earning $150,000 a year will now pay $8,698.05 in FICA taxes on their first $113,700 of income. Paying 5.65 percent on all $150,000 would cut that bill to $8,475. If businesses saw a rate cut as well, expenses would decrease, allowing business owners to invest or bring on more workers.

Additionally, a proposed rate cut would have to be phased out eventually, otherwise benefits of this plan would be much smaller than anticipated. However, there is a simple fix: a half-percent increase each year for four years allows Americans to adapt.

The vast majority of Americans would still see a net tax cut over those four years and be no worse off afterward. Businesses without higher-paid workers would be unaffected, and could receive a temporary cut. Consumer spending would rise, boosting the economy.

Best of all, Social Security and Medicare would have the revenue needed for future beneficiaries.


http://www.tcf.org/blog/detail/how-to-save-entitlements-without-really-trying
 


Chained CPI: Bargaining With Your Future
Oct 18, 2013

The Chained-CPI isn't just a one-time cut. Each year that passes means more cuts for seniors.

According to Social Security Works, an average earner who retired in 2011 at age 65 can expect to lose over $6,000 over 15 years if the Chained-CPI were adopted.

The Chained-CPI formula fails to take into account the large health care costs and rising living expenses faced by seniors with limited income. Our seniors cannot just substitute triple bypass surgery with a double bypass because it's cheaper.

By considering a switch to Chained-CPI, Members of Congress are bargaining with our future. Use the Social Security benefits change calculator from AARP here to see how much you stand to lose, then share it with your friends and contact your legislator.

Source: www.seiu.org


July/August 2013 Newsletter
Sep 06, 2013

Brothers and Sisters:

I hope that you had a great and safe 4th of July.

Upon the observance of the 235th birthday of our nation, we are finding it much more difficult to purchase products made in the USA. Here are a few websites I found to help us deal with this:

  • www.theunionshop.org
  • www.unionmade.com
  • www.americansworking.com

You can use Google, Bing or Yahoo search engines to find other sites.

The Executive Board thanks you for voting us in for another 2- year term. We bid our long time treasurer Ed Jackson (left) a heartfelt thank you for all the years of unwavering service he has provided this retirees club. We will miss Ed at our meetings and at bowling. Ed and his lovely wife Agnes have decided that now is a good time to do the traveling that they’ve been putting off for too long. We welcome Frank Supiot (below, right) as our new treasurer. Frank has been a long time trustee and will do a great job as our new treasurer. We also welcome Tom Miskimon as our newest trustee.

The hall for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Oldham Street. It’s near the corner of S. Oldham Street and O’Donnell Street, right behind the BP station and the next road from the Royal Farm Store. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O’Donnell Street exit of Route 895 (old tunnel). The summer party will be on August 18 and the Christmas party will be December 15. There are some changes that have been made: (1) The hours for the parties are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (instead of noon to 4 p.m.) and (2) NO ONE will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the beginning of the party. Start sending your envelopes in. They have to be received by August 8 and December 5, respectively.

New Members: N/A
Sick Members: Steve Glowacki
Deceased Members: Arthur James:Cargill/National Molasses, Cyrus Schierzka: W.T. Cowan
Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meeting will be on July 21 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. There will be no August meeting as the summer party will be in its place. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney,
President


September/October 2013 Newsletter
Sep 06, 2013

Dear Brother and Sisters,

On behalf of the A.R.M. Executive Board, we hope you had a safe and happy Labor Day.

Labor Day – a Canadian import?

   If you’re like most people, you celebrate Labor Day every year by doing something fun before summer ends. But how much do you really know about Labor Day?
   In the United States, we tend to think of Labor Day as a thoroughly American holiday, but Labor Day actually has its roots in Canada. The movement to shorten the average workday from 12 hours to nine started in Hamilton, Ontario, but quickly spread to Toronto, where it became a central demand of the Toronto Printer’s Union.
   When the proposal was firmly rejected by employers, the printers went on strike on March 25, 1872, and on April 15 a group of 2,000 workers, led by two marching bands, marched through the city streets to show their solidarity with the strikers. By the time the parade reached Queen’s Park, the crowd had grown to 10,000 or more.
   On June 28, 1894, Congress passed a bill that designated the first Monday in September as an annual federal holiday to celebrate the social and economic achievements of American workers and their contributions to the strength and prosperity of the nation. The labor movement had gained momentum and became increasingly influential in national politics when, on May 11, 1894, employees of the Pullman Palace Car Company in Chicago went on strike to protest wage cuts and the firing of union representatives.
    On June 26, Eugene V. Debs, leader of the American Railroad Union, called for a boycott of all Pullman railway cars. After the boycott crippled rail transportation nationwide, the federal government sent troops to Chicago to break the strike, which led to a series of riots that caused the deaths of more than a dozen workers.
    By making Labor Day a legal holiday, Congress hoped to regain the support of American workers. Grover Cleveland, who was both the 22nd and 24th president of the United States and the only U.S. president to serve two non-consecutive terms in office, signed the bill that made Labor Day a legal holiday for federal employees in the District of Columbia and all U.S. territories and, effectively, for American workers nationwide.
    On February 21, 1887, Oregon became the first state to make Labor Day an official holiday. Later that year, four more states—Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey and New York—passed legislation to create a Labor Day holiday. By the end of the decade, Connecticut, Nebraska and Pennsylvania also chose to honor workers with a special day. And by 1894, when Congress passed a bill making Labor Day a federal holiday, 23 other states had already adopted Labor Day legislation.
    Parades were a big part of early Labor Day celebrations, and many U.S. communities still hold parades on Labor Day every year. The first Labor Day parade was on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, (pictured, above left) but it was actually a protest march for safer working conditions, shorter hours and better wages for workers. Ten thousand workers gave up a day’s pay to take part in that first Labor Day parade, marching from City Hall to Wendel’s Elm Park at 92nd Street and 9th Avenue—the largest park in New York at that time—where they picnicked, enjoyed a concert and listened to speeches by union leaders. Later that evening, even more people came to the park to watch fireworks and dance.
    Peter McGuire, who founded the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and co-founded the American Federation of Labor (AFL) with the legendary Samuel Gompers, is often credited as the “Father of Labor Day.” But new evidence suggests that the idea may have come from a different labor leader with a similar name. Matthew Maguire was an important figure in the Central Labor Union of New York and led several strikes to improve working conditions. According to the New Jersey Historical Society and the U.S. Department of Labor, shortly after President Cleveland created Labor Day with his signature, The Paterson (N.J.) Morning Call published an editorial that called Maguire “the undisputed author of Labor Day as a holiday.” Gompers and Peter McGuire were friends, however, and Gompers considered Matthew Maguire a radical. So in an 1897 interview, Gompers gave McGuire the credit for suggesting the Labor Day holiday.
    The labor movement gave birth to Labor Day, and labor unions remained an important part of the holiday for decades after it was created. Labor union membership reached its peak during the 1950s, when approximately 40 percent of private-sector workers, and a significant number of government workers, belonged to labor unions, but union membership has declined sharply in recent years. (In 2012, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, union membership fell to 11.3 percent of wage and salary workers nationwide, including both public- and private-sector workers, the lowest level of union participation since the 1930s.)
    In the late 1800s, the average American worked 12 hours a day, seven days a week, just to get by. Child labor was common, even among children as young as 5 or 6 years old, and children worked equally long hours in factories and mines for a fraction of what adults were paid. Workers and labor unions had been calling for an eight-hour work day for many years, and various legislative attempts had been made to establish shorter shifts, but without much widespread success.
    It wasn’t until 1916, when Congress passed the Adamson Act, that the eight-hour work day gained a foothold in U.S. law as well as American culture. The Act established an eight-hour work day, with additional pay for overtime, for employees who operated trains for interstate railway carriers. The Adamson Act was the first federal legislation in the United States that regulated the hours of workers in private companies.
    The first five-day week in America was put in place by a New England spinning mill in 1908 to accommodate its Jewish workers, who had trouble observing the Sabbath under the traditional six-day work week. If they took Saturday off and worked Sunday, they risked offending the Christian majority, and to work on Saturday was a violation of their own religious beliefs.
    In 1926, Henry Ford started closing his factories all day Saturday and Sunday, creating the modern weekend by giving his workers two consecutive days off without reducing their pay.
    In 1929, the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America was the first union to negotiate a five-day work week for its members. After that, the rest of the nation slowly began to change, but it wasn’t until President Franklin Roosevelt signed the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which established a five-day, 40-hour week for many workers, that the great American weekend was born.
    Labor Day was the first Monday holiday in the United States, and one of the few designed to fall on a Monday from the start. The Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which took effect on January 1, 1971, created more three-day weekends for federal employees by making Memorial Day, Washington’s Birthday, Columbus Day and Veterans Day Monday holidays. The observance of Veterans Day was later changed back to November 11 by an act of Congress. When Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was created, it was also designated as a Monday holiday.
    When Congress created Labor Day in 1894, and decreed that it would fall on the first Monday in September every year, it was also creating what would eventually become a three-day weekend for most Americans. At the time, most U.S. workers still toiled at least six days per week, so at best the new Labor Day holiday gave them only two consecutive days off. Although summer doesn’t actually give way to autumn until late September, Labor Day is often considered the unofficial last day of summer, probably because it is often the last weekend before the new school year begins—a moment dreaded by children and welcomed by parents nationwide.
    According to Samuel Gompers, the first president of the American Federation of Labor (AFL), Labor Day is the only holiday that celebrates the common man (and woman)—not religion, a war anniversary, or the birth or death of a famous person. As he wrote in The New York Times on September 4, 1910: “Among all the festive days of the year, of all the days commemorative of great epochs in the world’s history, of all the days celebrated for one cause or another, there is not one which stands so conspicuously for social advancement of the common people as the first Monday in September of each recurring year — Labor Day.”

On September 8, we have the start of the regular Union meetings.

On September 11, "Never Forget" the tragic event that happened 12 years ago.

The summer party was great as always. A very special thanks to all of the volunteers. Also, special thanks to Charlie Long and his band for entertaining everyone. Thanks to Joe Reichert (right), the winner of the 50/50; Joe donated part of his winnings back to the club.

Remember that if you don’t contact us before the party and you don’t show, then we keep your envelopes. You can start sending your Christmas Party envelopes in now. This party is the one for which we welcome people to bring in cakes for the cake wheel. We will need volunteers.

Bowling has started and we can always use more bowlers.

The Teamsters' fall golf outing will be held on September 28 at Oakmont Green in Hampstead, MD. For more information, please call the Union Hall.

New Members: Jeff Butta
Sick Members: Lester Evans, Frank Barnett, Wayne Chaney, Ron Cusick and Jeff Butta
Deceased Members: Steve Glowacki (UPS), Clarence Roberts (Blue Diamond), Dynishie Johnson (Acme Markets), William McMillion (Leaseway), Laurin Houseknecht (Mountainside), and George Thomas (Sunpapers)
Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meetings will be on September 19 and October 17 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney,
President


May/June 2013 Newsletter
May 09, 2013
May/June 2013 Newsletter

May/June 2013

Brothers and Sisters:

May is here in all its glory, with summer rolling in on June 21. Mother's Day is May 12, and Armed Forces Day is May 18. This is a day to pay tribute to men and women who serve in the United States Armed Forces. At the end of the month, on May 27, we celebrate Memorial Day--a day of remembrance for those who have died serving our country.  In June, Flag Day is on the 14th and Father’s Day is on the 16th.

The regular union meeting was held this past Sunday, May 5. Our retirees once again handled the cookout for this meeting, and did a tremendous job. With between 225 and 250 members at the cookout, everything went very well. I want to thank each of the retired volunteers who helped out. This was the last Sunday meeting for Local until September.

We will continue to have our retirees' meetings the third Thursday of every month.

With beautiful weather and good food afterwards, 77 golfers had a great time at the annual spring golf outing on April 27 at Hog Neck Golf Course in Easton, Maryland. Hope to see you at the fall tournament. Bowling is over for the year and will resume again in September. A special thanks goes out to Joe Reichert, Mike Brett, and Mel Holden for doing an outstanding job running the bowling league.

It's election time again. I am happy to say that all of the officers have decided to run again on the same ticket. If anyone wishes to run, please have your nominations ready for the May meeting. Voting will be held at the June meeting.

I have received the following list of senior discounts many times over the past year, and thought that I would share it with you. Since many senior discounts are not advertised to the public, our advice to men and women over 55 is to ALWAYS ask a sales associate if that store provides a senior discount. Also, please note that some senior discounts vary by region. That way, you can be sure to get the most bang for your buck. Some of these might have strings attached, and some might be outdated. If you can get at least one that works, then this was worth sharing.

Remember: YOU must ASK for your discount!

RESTAURANTS:
Applebee's: 15% off with Golden Apple Card (60+)
Arby's: 10% off (55+)
Ben & Jerry's: 10% off (60+)
Bennigan's: discount varies by location (60+)
Bob's Big Boy: discount varies by location (60+)
Boston Market: 10% off (65+)
Burger King: 10% off (60+)
Chick-Fil-A: 10% off or free small drink or coffee (55+)
Chili's: 10% off (55+)
CiCi's Pizza: 10% off (60+)
Denny's: 10% off, 20% off for AARP members (55+)
Dunkin' Donuts: 10% off or free coffee (55+)
Einstein's Bagels: 10% off baker's dozen of bagels (60+)
Fuddrucker's: 10% off any senior platter (55+)
Gatti's Pizza: 10% off (60+)
Golden Corral: 10% off (60+)
Hardee's: $0.33 beverages everyday (65+)
IHOP: 10% off (55+)
Jack in the Box: up to 20% off (55+)
KFC: free small drink with any meal (55+)
Krispy Kreme: 10% off (50+)
Long John Silver's: various discounts at locations (55+)
McDonald's: discounts on coffee everyday (55+)
Mrs. Fields: 10% off at participating locations (60+)
Shoney's: 10% off Sonic: 10% off or free beverage (60+)
Steak 'n Shake: 10% off every Monday & Tuesday (50+)
Subway: 10% off (60+)
Sweet Tomatoes: 10% off (62+)
Taco Bell: 5% off; free beverages for seniors (65+)
TCBY: 10% off (55+)
Tea Room Cafe: 10% off (50+)
Village Inn: 10% off (60+)
Waffle House: 10% off every Monday (60+)
Wendy's: 10% off (55+)
White Castle: 10% off (62+)

RETAIL & APPAREL:
Banana Republic: 10% off (50+)
Bealls: 20% off first Tuesday of each month (50+)

Belk's: 15% off first Tuesday of every month (55+)
Big Lots: 10% off
Bon-Ton Department Stores: 15% off on senior discount days (55+)
C.J. Banks: 10% off every Wednesday (60+)
Clarks: 10% off (62+)
Dress Barn: 10% off (55+)
Goodwill: 10% off one day a week (date varies by location)
Hallmark: 10% off one day a week (date varies by location)
Kmart: 20% off (50+)
Kohl's: 15% off (60+)
Modell's Sporting Goods: 10% off
Rite Aid: 10% off on Tuesdays & 10% off prescriptions
Ross Stores: 10% off every Tuesday (55+)
The Salvation Army Thrift Stores: up to 50% off (55+)
Stein Mart: 20% off red dot/clearance items first Monday of every month (55+)

GROCERY:
Albertson's: 10% off first Wednesday of each month (55+)
American Discount Stores: 10% off every Monday (50+)

Compare Foods Supermarket: 10% off every Wednesday (60+)
DeCicco Family Markets: 5% off every Wednesday (60+)
Food Lion: 6% off every Monday (60+)
Fry's Supermarket: free Fry's VIP Club Membership & 10% off every Monday (55+)
Great Valu Food Store: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)
Gristedes Supermarket: 10% off every Tuesday (60+)
Harris Teeter: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)
Hy-Vee: 5% off one day a week (date varies by location)
Kroger: 10% off (date varies by location)
Morton Williams Supermarket: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)
The Plant Shed: 10% off every Tuesday (50+)
Publix: 5% off every Wednesday (55+)
Rogers Marketplace: 5% off every Thursday (60+)
Uncle Guiseppe's Marketplace: 5% off (62+)

TRAVEL:
Airlines:
Alaska Airlines: 10% off (65+)
American Airlines: various discounts for 65 and up (call before booking for discount)

Continental Airlines: no initiation fee for Continental Presidents Club & special fares for select destinations
Southwest Airlines: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
United Airlines: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
U.S. Airways: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
Rail:
Amtrak: 15% off (62+)
Bus:
Greyhound: 5% off (62+)
Trailways Transportation System: various discounts for ages 50+

Car Rental:
Alamo Car Rental: up to 25% off for AARP members
Avis: up to 25% off for AARP members Best Western: 10% off (55+)

Budget Rental Cars: 10% off; up to 20% off for AARP members (50+)
Dollar Rent-A-Car: 10% off (50+)
Enterprise Rent-A-Car: 5% off for AARP members
Hertz: up to 25% off for AARP members
National Rent-A-Car: up to 30% off for AARP members
Overnight Accommodations:
Cambria Suites: 20%-30% off (60+)
Clarion Motels: 20%-30% off (60+)

Comfort Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)
Comfort Suites: 20%-30% off (60+)
Econo Lodge: 20%-30% off (60+)
Hampton Inns & Suites: 10% off when booked 72 hours in advance
Holiday Inn: 10%-30% off depending on location (62+)

Hyatt Hotels: 25%-50% off (62+)
InterContinental Hotels Group: various discounts at all hotels (65+)
Mainstay Suites: 10% off with Mature Traveler's Discount (50+);20%-30% off (60+)
Marriott Hotels: 15% off (62+)
Motel 6: 10% off (60+)
Myrtle Beach Resort: 10% off (55+)
Quality Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)
Rodeway Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)
Sleep Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)

ACTIVITIES & ENTERTAINMENT:
AMC Theaters: up to 30% off (55+)
Bally Total Fitness: up to $100 off memberships (62+)

Busch Gardens Tampa, FL: $3 off one-day tickets (50+)
Carmike Cinemas: 35% off (65+)
Cinemark/Century Theaters: up to 35% off
U.S. National Parks: $10 lifetime pass; 50% off additional services including camping (62+)
Regal Cinemas: 30% off Ripley's Believe it or Not: @ off one-day ticket (55+)
SeaWorld Orlando, FL: $3 off one-day tickets (50+)

CELL PHONE DISCOUNTS:
AT&T: Special Senior Nation 200 Plan $29.99/month (65+)
Jitterbug: $10/month cell phone service (50+)

Verizon Wireless: Verizon Nationwide 65 Plus Plan $29.99/month (65+).

MISCELLANEOUS:
Great Clips: $3 off hair cuts (60+)
Super Cuts: $2 off haircuts (60+)

Now, go out there and claim your discounts, and remember — YOU must ASK for your discount. No ask, no discount.

New Members: Richard Garland
Sick Members: Steve Glowacki, Mike Brett, Wayne Chaney, Ron Cusick, Roland Hall, Jimmy Dvorak
Deceased Members: Will Davidson

Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next two meetings will be on May 16 and June 20 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m.  The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there.  Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney,
President


March/April 2013 Newsletter
Mar 27, 2013

March/April 2013

Brothers and Sisters:

Well, I guess it's safe to say that you are as fed up with this cold winter weather as I am.

It's looking better as we are getting closer to good weather, with spring training underway and St. Paddy’s day on March 17th. The first day of spring will be here on March 20th, with Easter on March 31st. Don’t forget to set your clocks ahead on March 10th.

The bowling banquet is to be held on May 8th at the Union Hall from 12 noon to 4 p.m. Remember this is for bowlers only.

Not All Thieves are Stupid: This gives us something to think about with all our new electronic technology...

GPS: A couple of weeks ago a friend told me that someone she knew had their car broken into while they were at a football game. Their car was parked on the green which was adjacent to the football stadium, and specially allotted to football fans. Things stolen from the car included a garage door remote control, some money and a GPS which had been prominently mounted on the dashboard. When the victims got home, they found that their house had been ransacked and just about everything worth anything had been stolen. The thieves had used the GPS to guide them to the house. They then used the garage remote control to open the garage door and gain entry to the house. The thieves knew the owners were at the football game, they knew what time the game was scheduled to finish and so they knew how much time they had to clean out the house. It would appear that they had brought a truck to empty the house of its contents. This is something to consider if you have a GPS. Don't put your home address in it… Put a nearby address (like a store or gas station) so you can still find your way home if you need to, but no one else would know where you live if your GPS were stolen.

MOBILE PHONES: I never thought of this. A lady has now changed her habit of how she lists her names on her mobile phone after her handbag was stolen. Her handbag, which contained her cell phone, credit card, wallet, etc., was stolen. Twenty minutes later when she called her husband from a pay phone telling him what had happened, he said, “I received your text asking about our PIN number and I replied a little while ago.” When they rushed down to the bank, the bank staff told them all the money was already withdrawn. The thief had actually used the stolen cell phone to text 'hubby' in the contact list and got hold of the PIN number. Within 20 minutes he had withdrawn all the money from their bank account.

MORAL OF THE LESSON: Do not disclose the relationship between you and the people in your contact list. Avoid using names like Home, Honey, Hubby, Sweetheart, Dad, Mom, etc.... And very importantly, when sensitive info is being asked through texts, CONFIRM by calling back. Also, when you're being texted by friends or family to meet them somewhere, be sure to call back to confirm that the message came from them. If you don't reach them, be very careful about going places to meet “family and friends” who text you. PLEASE PASS THIS ON “I never thought about the above! As of now, I no longer have 'home' listed on my cell phone.” Even if this does not pertain to you....Pass it on to your family & friends.

FYI:  Re UPC barcode information - Remember, if the barcode begins with the numbers 690-695, then the product was made in China. Buy things made in the USA!

Remember, the Teamsters Local No. 355 website is www.teamsters355.com. The retirees have a link on the web page. Don’t forget to check out the photo links.

New Members: Gilbert Heiland (Baltimore Sun), Eric Regan (Penske), Bob Brown (UPS), Ron Biller (Preston), and Benjamin Risso (ABF).
Sick Members: Steve Glowacki, Joe Reichert, Joe Gardner, John Loritz, Will Davidson, Steve Eckelt, and John Irwin.
Deceased Members: Jessie Artis (Esskay), William Hedge (Reliable Liquor), Joseph Dober (News American), John Kosko (Reliable Liquor). and Dick Chandler (Mountainside).
   Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The March meeting will be held on Thursday, the 21th, and the April meeting on Thursday the 18th, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local Union No. 355, 1030 South Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD 21223. Coffee and donuts are served starting at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m. The general meeting starts at 11 a.m. A light lunch will be served following the general meeting. Remember to bring another retired member with you to the meetings.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney,
President


Mr President, Please Define ‘Slash’
Mar 22, 2013

Mr. President, Please Define 'Slash'

Posted: 03/21/2013 6:09 pm

The Huffington Post

By Max Richtman
President and CEO, National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare

When I met with President Obama and other allied groups at the White House just after his reelection, his commitment to carry out the promises made during the campaign seemed clear and unambiguous. The president acknowledged Social Security should not be a part of the deficit debate. This was especially important to millions of American families still struggling in this economy who depend on Social Security's modest benefit -- the benefit they've contributed to throughout their working lives. Unfortunately, within months, President Obama's unambiguous statement has taken a 180 degree turn and a proposal cutting Social Security benefits for both current and future retirees has once again become a deficit debate bargaining chip. However, as a consolation, the president promises he won't "slash" benefits.

Mr. President, please define "slash."

The Stealth Benefit Cut

There's a political calculus behind cutting benefits to millions of seniors, veterans, people with disabilities and more by reducing the federal cost of living allowance. Cutting the COLA is being pitched as a simple "technical tweak" or "formula adjustment" that's more accurate than the current COLA formula. Sounds reasonable, right? However, claims that the current COLA is too generous are demonstrably false. So much so, the White House is considering "protecting" millions of low-income Americans, some veterans and "older" beneficiaries from this COLA cut. If the chained-CPI really is a more accurate formula, why the exemption?

The Social Security COLA has averaged just over 2% over the past five years with 0% for two of those years, far below the largest expenditure increase for most seniors, health care. If accuracy, not cutting benefits, is the goal then we should be talking about the elderly formula (CPI-E) which factors in seniors' health care costs and has been under review by the federal government for decades. However, that won't happen because there's no guarantee the CPI-E will cut benefits. The chained CPI, on the other hand, will. This COLA change is nothing more than a stealth benefit cut Washington politicians hope will fly under the radar of the millions of American families it targets. On behalf of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare's millions of members and supporters I've written to the president about his COLA proposal:

"The 'chained CPI' is not a 'technical tweak,' and no amount of rationalization can make it so. In reality, the chained CPI is a benefit cut for the oldest and most vulnerable Americans who would be least able to afford it. To offer to trade it away outside the context of a comprehensive Social Security solvency proposal ignores the fact that Social Security does not even belong in this debate because it does not contribute to the deficit. Cutting Social Security benefits to reduce the deficit is unacceptable to the vast majority of Americans across all ages and political affiliation."

Slash? You Decide

Cutting benefits by adopting the chained CPI, as proposed by the White House, would cut the COLA by 3% for workers retired for ten years and 6% for workers retired for twenty years. This translates to a benefit cut of $130 per year in Social Security benefits for a typical 65 year-old, including today's retirees. The cumulative cut for that individual would be $4,631 or more than three months of benefits by age 75; $13,910 or nearly a year of benefits by age 85; and $28,004, more than a year and a half of benefits by age 95. Losing three months up to more than a year and half of income would count as "slashing benefits" by anyone's standards, especially for America's oldest retirees, veterans and people with disabilities living on modest incomes. These chained CPI cuts also deliver a larger percentage cut to seniors' annual income than the tax increases on the wealthiest Americans passed earlier this year deliver to our nation's millionaires. An analysis by Dean Baker with the Center for Economic and Policy Research shows the after tax income for wealthy Americans was reduced by less than 0.7 percent after January's tax hike. By comparison, the percentage of income Social Security beneficiaries will lose would be three times as much if the chained CPI is adopted.

So Much for "Shared Sacrifice"

Requiring benefit cuts to Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid in the name of deficit reduction has always been the goal of the billion dollar corporate and Wall Street backed crisis campaign driving Washington's deficit hysteria. These millionaires, billionaires and their supporters in Congress have used the economic recession to fuel their anti-Social Security and Medicare mission. The Obama administration and some Democrats in Congress have bought into the flawed idea that they must trade away middle-class benefits just to get Republicans to the table and further, if a millionaire loses a tax break then the middle class and poor most also lose their modest benefits in Medicare or Social Security. There's nothing balanced about this type of deal. But it does explain how the deficit reduction passed since 2011 includes 75% cuts (mostly to programs serving the poor and middle-class) and only 25% revenue increases (not just from the wealthy). This mythological "shared sacrifice" continues as President Obama has now told Congress he's "willing to back $2 in spending cuts for every $1 in tax revenue" in any future deal. Even that isn't enough for Republicans who expect average Americans to foot the entire deficit reduction bill through program cuts rather than closing the trillion dollars of wasteful millionaire and corporate loopholes and tax breaks.

"In addition, we should not fool ourselves that your negotiating partners will be satisfied with lowering Social Security COLAs or raising the Medicare eligibility age. Each debt limit increase, Continuing Resolution or sequestration will give them a second, third and fourth 'bite at the apple.' In November, you won the confidence of the American people by defending the middle class. I urge you not to let them down now by supporting a deal that undermines the last remaining retirement security pillars for middle-class Americans." Letter to President Obama, March 20, 2013

Americans Won't Be Fooled

Inside the Beltway, members of Congress might also be able to kid themselves that middle-class families won't notice a Social Security benefit cut here and a Medicare benefit cut there. However, they will find a very different truth when they go home to their Congressional districts. Not because America is a nation of "takers" or "greedy geezers" but because Americans understand the difference between harmful benefit cuts to the poor and middle-class and reasonable reforms, such as lifting the Social Security payroll tax cap and allowing Medicare to negotiate for lower drug prices. They don't believe a dollar in millionaire taxes is the same as a dollar cut from the average annual $14,000 earned Social Security benefit. Most importantly, the American people are willing to pay to preserve and even strengthen these vital benefits. They've said this over and over again, most recently at the polls in November.

Will Congress listen now that the election is over? If not, they shouldn't be surprised that voters deliver the same message when they return to the polls next time

Follow Max Richtman on Twitter: www.twitter.com/maxrichtman


January/February 2013 Newsletter
Feb 07, 2013

Brothers and Sisters:

First off, let me wish everyone a Happy New Year.

The Christmas party was a smash hit. We had a fantastic turnout of over 250. The food was awesome and the hall nicely decorated for the holidays.  A special thanks to the executive committee for doing another spectacular job.  It takes a lot of time and volunteers to make these parties the success that they are.

Even though we didn't have as many cakes and the money wheel wasn't as popular as past years, a very special thanks to each and every one of you who provided cakes for the cake wheel, bought the 50/50's and basket of cheer tickets, and played the money wheel. We did real good with the collectibles that were donated by a brother and his wife (they wish to remain anonymous).  

Congratulations to George Graile for winning the basket of cheer and graciously donating the cart back to the club, and to Judy Greene who won the 50/50 and kindly donated a nice amount back to the club. Thank you. 

Congratulations to the following people who won the 3,2,1 Drawing at the general meeting in December: 
First prize: Kirk Greaver
Second prize: Robby Robinson
Third prize: Dave White

Just a reminder on snow closings:

Bowling–If Anne Arundel County schools are closed because of weather, then there will be no bowling. If A.A. schools are delayed in opening 1 or 2 hours because of weather, then we will be bowling.

ARM Meetings–If Baltimore City schools are closed because of weather, then there will be no meeting. If Baltimore City schools are delayed 1 or 2 hours because of weather, then we will have our meeting.

New Members: John Harvey, James Bandoch, Richard Treherne and Thomas Madkins

Sick Members:  Steve Golwacki, Jessie Artis, John Loritz, Ernest Botitz, Frank Debinski, Steve Eckell, and John Irwin

Deceased Members: Ray Bingel (Baltimore Sun) and Wilbert Brown (Penske) Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meetings will be on January 17 and February 21 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD.  Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m.  The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m.  A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there.  Remember to bring another retiree with you.                                       

Fraternally,

Bob Eney
President


2012 Christmas Party
Jan 27, 2013

 

Jan. 27, 2012 | Turnout for our annual Christmas party grows every year and our 2012 party was no exception. The UAW Hall in Baltimore is the perfect venue for our events, providing great food and excellent service. Check out our photos, courtesy of retiree Stan Pietrowski, of smiling Local 355 retirees and their guests who shared in the festive fun.


November/December 2012 Newsletter
Dec 12, 2012

November/December 2012

Brothers and Sisters,

You are receiving this late due to the fact that the phone lines and the internet was down at the Union Hall for a period of time.

Dates of interest:

November 6th is Election Day (hope you voted).

November 11th is Veterans Day.

November 22th is Thanksgiving Day.

December 10th is the cutoff date for your envelopes to be sent in for the Christmas Party.

December 20th is our Christmas Party.

December 25th is Christmas Day.

The difference between Veterans Day and Memorial Day. Memorial Day honors service members who died in service to their country or as a result of injuries incurred during battle. Deceased veterans are also remembered on Veterans Day but the day is set aside to thank and honor living veterans who served honorably in the military - in wartime or peacetime.

There are a lot of places honoring our veterans on or around Veterans Day. You can Google Veterans Day discounts or freebees or go to web sites such as www.military.com.

The hall for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Oldham Street. It's near the corner of South Oldham Street and O’Donnell Street, right behind the BP station. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O’Donnell Street exit of Route 895 (old tunnel). The Christmas party will be held on Thursday December 20th. Not the 21st as posted in the last newsletter.

There are some changes that have been made: (1) The hours for the parties are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (instead of noon to 4 p.m.), and (2) NO ONE will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the start of the party.

Start getting your envelopes in. Remember that your check should be $25 if one person and $50 if 2 people. You will get your check back at the party. They have to be received by December 10th. There will be a cake wheel and a money wheel. We need volunteers for both of the wheels. Please bring cakes for the cake wheel; thank you in advance.

MENU

Steamed Shrimp
Top Round Beef on the Pit
Sweet Honey Ham on the Pit
Sweet Italian Sausage on the Pit
Homemade Maryland Crab Soup
Shrimp Creole
Creamy Whipped Garlic & Parsley Potatoes
BBQ Chicken
Sweet Corn Casserole
Sauerkraut & Kielbasa
Greek Salad with Fresh Feta
Homemade Pasta Salad
Assorted Cheese Platters
Chips & Pretzels
Assortment of Breads & Rolls for the Pit items

All Fixin’s & Condiments
Assorted Sheet cakes ~ Coffee
Draft Beer (2) Selections (Budweiser & Miller Light)
Non alcoholic beer
Soda, Coffee, Ice Tea, Lemonade, Bottled Water

Remember to purchase some of the 3, 2, 1 and basket of cheer tickets.

New Members: David Rogers Jr., Bueford Byrd

Sick members: Steve Glowacki, Jessie Artis, Frank Debinski, Steve Eckelt

Deceased members: Fred Schmidt, Gene Speed Sr., and Edward Shufford

Remember to keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meeting will be on Nov 15, 2012, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Remember, there will be no meeting in December due to the Christmas party. Our January, meeting in 2013 is on the 17th.

Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m., the Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the General Meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the General Meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney,
A.R.M. President


Study: Romney's Medicaid Scheme Would Throw 10s of Millions Off Rolls
Oct 25, 2012

Oct. 26, 2012 | A study released Tuesday by the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation finds that block-granting Medicaid, as Romney proposes, would see tens of millions of poor Americans lose their health insurance, while the remaining Medicaid beneficiaries would get reduced coverage. Romney also wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act, including its expansion of Medicaid. Between block-granting Medicaid and scrapping ACA, Romney would take health insurance away from between 31 and 37.5 million Americans. Read more here.


The Romney-Ryan Plan to Obliterate Medicaid
Oct 19, 2012

 

If the GOP ticket gets its way, the poor and the elderly can kiss their coverage goodbye.

By Kevin Drum
Mother Jones

Barrels of ink have been spilled over Medicare during this year's campaign. There's nothing wrong with that: Obama and Romney have fundamentally different approaches to Medicare and they deserve attention. Romney, for example, wants to increase the eligibility age to 67 and convert Medicare into a voucher system that relies primarily on competition between private firms to rein in costs. That's a big change. At the same time, the actual differences in what the two candidates would spend on Medicare is fairly modest. This is more a fight over means than ends.

The same can't be said for Medicaid. Romney wants radical changes here too, promising to "block grant" Medicaid if he's elected. This means the program would be turned over entirely to the states. The federal government would continue to provide a share of funding, but that funding would go straight into state coffers, and states could decide how to spend it. So the question is: Once released from federal regulations, what would states do with their Medicaid money?

Romney's plan represents a massive change in our commitment to providing decent medical care for those who can least afford it.

Some states would probably try some genuinely interesting experiments, though it's unlikely we'll ever discover any magic bullets for reining in health care costs on a state level. But lots of states, especially poor states in the South, don't have much interest in experimenting. They just want to slash eligibility for Medicaid. Given the freedom to do it, they'd adopt what Ed Kilgore calls the "Mississippi model," [1] cutting off coverage for a family of three earning anything over $8,200. For all the talk of fresh thinking and new solutions, what they really want to do is simple: They want to stop providing medical care for poor people.

But that's not all. In this case, there's more than just differences in ideology at work. Unlike Medicare, which he's willing to fund at about the same rate as Obama, Romney doesn't want to spend as much on Medicaid as Obama does. In fact, he wants to take a chainsaw to it. Aaron Carroll and Austin Frakt took a look at the Romney and Obama plans in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week, and the chart above shows their conclusions. [2] On Medicare, the two candidates want to spend roughly similar amounts of money. On Medicaid, Romney wants to spend way, way less. And not just on poor people. As Jon Cohn points out, [3] cuts of this size will have a huge impact on "dual eligibles," elderly patients who rely on Medicaid to pay their nursing home bills. This is not a minor point of technocratic disagreement. It represents a massive change in our commitment to providing decent medical care for those who can least afford it. Medicaid, much more than Medicare, demonstrates what's really at stake in November's election.

Source URL:

http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2012/10/romney-ryan-medicaid Links: [1] http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/political-animal-a/2012_10/the_mississippi_model040248.php [2] http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1379004 [3] http://www.tnr.com/blog/plank/108435/romney-ryan-medicaid-block-grant-cut-elderly-nursing-home-ltc


2012 Summer Party
Sep 26, 2012

The Association of Retired Members held their Summer Party August 16, 2012 at the UAW Hall in Baltimore. Photos are available for viewing here. Photos by Stan Pietrowski


September/October 2012 Newsletter
Sep 04, 2012

Correction: The Christmas Party will be held Dec. 2o, not Dec. 21.

September/October 2012

Brothers and Sisters:

   I hope that you all had a safe Labor Day holiday. In my local county newspaper, there was a political cartoon that said, "If on this Labor Day you’re lucky enough to still have a job with decent pay, retirement and health benefits, sick leave and vacation time……you can thank a union member." I could not say it any better.

   After this Labor Day holiday, there isn’t much happening for awhile. On Sept 9, the regular union meetings start; the Fall Golf Outing is Sept 29. Fall officially begins on Sept 22. In October we have Columbus Day on the 8th, and Halloween on the 31st.

   The Summer Party was great as always. A very special thanks to all of the volunteers. Thanks to Francis Burke, the winner of the 50/50, who donated $25 of his winnings back to the club. Congratulations to Sandy Kurtz for winning the Ken Singleton autographed baseball and the autographed picture donated by Brother Dan Molino, and a Ken Singleton baseball card donated by Brother Bob Townsley.

   Bowling has started and we are always looking for more bowlers. We bowl on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at Glen Burnie Bowl at Richie Highway and the 695 Beltway Brooklyn exit.

   The Teamsters Local Union 355 Fall Golf Outing will be held on Saturday, September 29, 2012, at Bay Hills Golf Club, located at 545 Bay Hills Drive, Arnold, MD. It will be a shotgun start beginning at 9 a.m. The entry fee is $40 which includes greens fee, cart, range balls, gift, lunch and prizes. Money and application must be in no later than Friday September 21, 2012. Please call the Union Hall at 410-566-5700 for more information. Hope to see you at the tournament.

   The hall for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Oldham Street. It’s near the corner of S. Oldham Street and O’Donnell Street, right behind the BP station and the next road from the Royal Farm Store. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O’Donnell Street exit of Route 895 (old tunnel). The Christmas party this year will be on December 20. Envelopes have to be in by December 11. There are some changes that have been made: (1) The hours for the parties are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (instead of noon to 4 p.m.) and (2) NO ONE will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the beginning of the party. Start sending your envelopes in. This is the party where you bring in cakes and pies for the cake wheel. We will also have a money wheel, and the basket of cheer drawing will be held. (We could use more donations; you can drop them off at the hall.)

New Members: James Nohe
Sick Members: Steve Glowacki, Ernest Boritz, Perry Conway, Dick Chandler and Jesse Artis
Deceased Members: Lawrence Hopson (Sysco), Robert Piaskowski (ABF) and Phil Helwig (UPS)

   Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meetings will be on September 20 and October 18 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,
Bob Eney President


July/August 2012 Newsletter
Jul 11, 2012

July/August 2012

Brothers and Sisters,

   Where has this year gone?!! One minute it's spring, and now it's summer. I guess the older we get, the faster time flies.

   Besides celebrating the birth of our nation on July 4th, we have the following month-long observances: Anti-Boredom Month, National Baked Bean Month, National Blueberry Month, National Hot Dog Month, National Ice Cream Month, National Picnic Month, National Recreation Month. In August, besides the 2nd week being Elvis Week, we have the following month-long observances: American Artist Appreciation Month, Foot Health Month, Home Business Month, National Catfish Month, National Golf Month, National Inventors Month, and National Water Quality Month. I tell you, the stuff you can find on the computer is mind- boggling!

   FYI: DON'T WASTE THAT LEMON PEEL
   Many professionals in restaurants and eateries are using or consuming the entire lemon and nothing is wasted.
   How can you use the whole lemon without waste? Simple ... place the lemon in the freezer section of your refrigerator. Once the lemon is frozen, get your grater, and shred the whole lemon (no need to peel it) and sprinkle it on top of your foods. Sprinkle it into your whiskey, wine, vegetable salad, ice cream, soup, noodles, spaghetti sauce, rice, sushi, and fish dishes. All of the foods will unexpectedly have a wonderful taste, something that you may have never tasted before. Most likely, you only think of lemon juice and vitamin C, but not anymore. Now that you've learned this lemon secret, you can use lemon even in instant cup of noodles.
   What's the major advantage of using the whole lemon other than preventing waste and adding new taste to your dishes? Well, you see lemon peels contain as much as 5 to 10 times more vitamins than the lemon juice itself. And yes, that's what you've been wasting. But from now on, by following this simple procedure of freezing the whole lemon, then grating it on top of your dishes, you can consume all of those nutrients and get even healthier. It's also good that lemon peels are health rejuvenators in eradicating toxic elements in the body.
   So place your lemon in your freezer, and then grate it on your meal every day. It is a key to make your foods tastier and you get to live healthier and longer! That's the lemon secret!

   The bowling banquet was held on May 9th, and it was another great success. Bowling this year starts on August 29th. Please be there by 9:30 for a short meeting. We can always use new bowlers. If you don’t want to be on a team, then just come in as a sub. On May 20th, the retirees put on a cookout for the regular members. We asked for volunteers to help, and the response was overwhelming. Thanks to all, and a special thanks to Rich Parker and Joe Skiratko for battling the smoke all day.

   The hall for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Oldham Street. It's near the corner of South Oldham Street and O’Donnell Street, right behind the BP station. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O’Donnell Street exit of Route 895 (old tunnel).

   The summer party will be held on August 16th. There are some changes that have been made: (1) The hours for the parties are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (instead of noon to 4 p.m.), and (2) NO ONE will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the start of the party. Start getting your envelopes in. Remember that your check is for $25 if one person and $50 if 2 people. You will get your check back at the party. They have to be received by August 9th. There will be a money wheel. We need volunteers for the wheel and to sell 50/50’s. Remember to purchase some of the 3, 2, 1 and basket of cheer tickets. We will also be having a raffle for an autographed baseball and autographed picture of former Baltimore Oriole great Ken Singleton. A big thanks to brother Dan Molino for donating these items.

New Members: James Ferrell, Samuel Torrence
Sick members: Steve Glowacki, Milt Stapf, Jessie Artis, John Dehn, Perry Conway, Walt Myers, Ray Bingle and Dick Chandler.
Deceased members: Francis Ireland, Harvey Gartrell and Lawrence Hopson.
   Please remember to keep these members in your thoughts and prayers.

   The next meeting will be on July 19, 2012, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Remember there will be no meeting in August due to the Summer party. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m., the Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the General Meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the General Meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,
Bob Eney President


2012 Bowling Banquet
May 23, 2012

 

The Association of Retired Members held a banquet May 10, 2012 at Local 355's Baltimore hall to close their 2012 Bowling Season. Photos are available for viewing here.


May/June 2012 Newsletter
May 08, 2012

May/June 2012

Brothers and Sisters:

May is here in all its glory, with summer rolling in on June 20.

Mother's Day is May 13, and Armed Forces Day is May 19. This is a day to pay tribute to the men and women who serve in the United States Armed Forces. At the end of the month, on May 28, we celebrate Memorial Day, a day of remembrance for those who have died serving our country.

In June, Flag Day is on the 14th and Father’s Day is the 17th. Remember that the regular union meeting has been moved from Sunday, May 6, to Sunday, May 20. This will be the last Sunday meeting for Local 355 until September. At this meeting, the retirees always hold a cookout for the members. If you can help, please be at the hall around 8:30 a.m.

We still have our retiree meetings the third Thursday of every month.

With great weather and food afterwards, 72 golfers had a great time at the Annual Spring Golf Outing on the Eastern Shore.

Bowling is about done for this season; the banquet will be held on May 9 for bowlers only. We hope to see more bowlers when the new season starts in September.

Helpful Hints:

  • For icy door steps in freezing temperatures: Get warm water and put Dawn dish washing liquid in it. Pour it all over the steps. They won't refreeze. (Wish I had known this for the last 40 years!)
  • To remove old wax from a glass candle holder, put it in the freezer for a few hours. Then take the candle holder out and turn it upside down. The wax will fall out.
  • Crayon marks on walls? Use a damp rag, dipped in baking soda; the marks come off with little effort.
  • Permanent marker on appliances/counter tops (like store receipt BLUE!)? Use rubbing alcohol on paper towel.
  • Whenever I purchase a box of S.O.S pads, I immediately take a pair of scissors and cut each pad into halves. After years of having to throw away rusted and unused and smelly pads, I finally decided that this would be much more economical. Now a box of S.O.S pads last me indefinitely! In fact, I have noticed that the scissors get “sharpened'' this way!
  • Blood stains on clothes? Not to worry! Just pour a little hydrogen peroxide on a cloth and proceed to wipe off every drop of blood. Works every time!
  • Use vertical strokes when washing windows outside and horizontal for inside windows. This way you can tell which side has the streaks. Straight vinegar will get outside windows really clean. Don't wash windows on a sunny day. They will dry too quickly and will probably streak.
  • Spray a bit of perfume on the light bulb in any room to create a light scent in each room when the light is turned on.
  • Place fabric softener sheets in dresser drawers and your clothes will smell freshly washed for weeks to come. You can also do this with towels and linens.
  • Candles will last a lot longer if placed in the freezer for at least 3 hours prior to burning.
  • To clean artificial flowers, pour some salt into a paper bag and add the flowers. Shake vigorously as the salt will absorb all the dust and dirt and leave your artificial flowers looking like new!
  • To easily remove burnt food from your skillet, simply add a drop or two of dish soap and enough water to cover bottom of pan, and bring to a boil on stove top.
  • Spray your Tupperware with nonstick cooking spray before pouring in tomato based sauces and there won't be any stains.
  • Wrap celery in aluminum foil when putting in the refrigerator and it will keep for weeks.
  • When boiling corn on the cob, add a pinch of sugar to help bring out the corn's natural sweetness.
  • Cure for headaches: Take a lime, cut it in half, and rub it on your forehead. The throbbing will go away. (I prefer to soak the lime in gin and rub it on my tongue first.)
  • Don't throw out all that leftover wine. Freeze into ice cubes for future use in casseroles and sauces. Left over wine? What's that? :)
  • To get rid of itching from mosquito bites, apply soap on the area and you will get instant relief.
  • Ants, ants, ants everywhere. Well, they are said to never cross a chalk line. So, get your chalk out and draw a line on the floor or wherever ants tend to march.
  • Use air freshener to clean mirrors. It does a good job and, better still, leaves a pleasant smell to the shine. W
  • When you get a splinter, reach for the scotch tape before resorting to tweezers or a needle. Simply put the scotch tape over the splinter, and then pull it off. Scotch tape removes most splinters painlessly and easily.
  • Now look what you can do with Alka Seltzer: Clean a toilet. Drop in two Alka Seltzer tablets, wait twenty minutes, brush and flush. To remove a stain from the bottom of a glass vase or cruet, fill with water, and drop in two Alka Seltzer tablets. Polish jewelry. Drop two Alka Seltzer tablets into a glass of water and immerse the jewelry for two minutes. Clean a thermos bottle. Fill the bottle with water, drop in four Alka Seltzer tablets, and let soak for an hour (or longer, if necessary). Unclog a drain. Clear the sink drain by dropping three Alka Seltzer tablets down the drain followed by a cup of Heinz White Vinegar. Wait a few minutes, and then run the hot water. Makes you wonder about ingesting Alka Seltzer, doesn't it?

New Members: Donna Riley, Robert Dunaway and Robert Meninger.

Sick Members: Steve Glowacki, Lawrence Hopson, Perry Conaway, Milton Stapf, Bill Hicks, John Dehn, Jerry Kraft and Jessie Artis.

Deceased Members: Winfred Cannaday and Harry Berman (Kane).

Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meetings will be on May 17 and June 21 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney
President


Beef Up Social Security Benefits, Don't Cut Them
Apr 26, 2012

The best way to improve Social Security's value is by increasing benefits to better serve the neediest workers and expanding its reach to cover workers and dependents who have been excluded.

 

By Michael Hiltzik
The Los Angeles Times


April 25, 2012 | Advocates for strengthening Social Security have come to dread the release of the annual report of the program's trustees.

That's because the event has become the basis for more hand-wringing about Social Security's fiscal condition and calls to cut benefits for current and future retirees. This week's release of the 2012 report is no exception.

If you concentrate on what is sure to be the headline figure, you're led to believe that the program has seldom been in lousier shape. Largely because of disappointing economic growth, high unemployment and an unexpectedly large cost-of-living increase for beneficiaries, the date of exhaustion of the program's trust fund has been moved forward three years to 2033 since last year's report.

What won't be adequately explained is that the program isn't "insolvent" or "bankrupt." Even if you accept the dire forecast, it's still two decades off. Economic recovery alone will improve the program's fiscal condition, and the trustees say that even if Congress does absolutely nothing, in 2033 there still will be money to pay about 75% of currently scheduled benefits.

And by the way, despite facing the worst economic conditions in its history, the program ran a surplus of $69 billion last year, increasing the trust fund to nearly $2.7 trillion.

The greater danger in all the panicky talk that will come from politicians and pundits, not to mention Wall Street grandees, about this manifestly conjectural projection is that it will keep people from focusing on the most important figure in the trustees' report. It appears on Page 2, and what it says is that right now Social Security is providing benefits to 55 million people.

That testifies to the reach of a program that keeps 20 million Americans out of poverty and helps stabilize the economy by putting money into the hands of people who will spend it on goods and services. And it points to the best way to improve Social Security's value for all Americans: by increasing benefits to better serve the neediest workers, and expanding its reach to cover workers and dependents who have been cheated by or excluded from the system for far too long.

Yes, you heard me right. It's time to shut down the talk of cutting benefits, which serves nobody, and pump up the volume on making them better.

The idea has been around for years, but its supporters have been hunkered down against a conservative campaign to cut, cut, cut. It's emerging from its foxhole now because the long recession and two stock market crashes have put the final bullets into the hopes of millions of Americans for a secure retirement.

Of the customary three legs of the retirement stool, two — personal savings and employer-paid pensions — have been shattered into smithereens by the markets, high unemployment and changes in workplace benefits. Social Security is the third leg.

"What we really should be doing is beefing up the third leg of the stool, and not breaking it too," says Kelly Ross, a retirement expert at the AFL-CIO. The union is calling for increasing benefits across the board, changing the cost-of-living formula to an index geared to the real costs faced by seniors, and scrapping the cap on wage income subject to payroll taxes, which has been set for this year at $110,100.

Similar provisions are found in the most comprehensive congressional proposal to upgrade Social Security, introduced by Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) in his Rebuild America Act. Social Security's actuaries calculate that the tax increase in Harkin's measure, to be phased in over a decade, would virtually eliminate any Social Security deficit until mid-century while paying for an across-the-board monthly benefit raise of $65 after 10 years.

Harkin would also base retiree cost-of-living raises on the CPI-E, an inflation index that overweights goods and services that consume a lot of elderly people's budgets, such as medical care. The CPI-E rises at about 0.2 percentage points a year faster than the regular CPI, which makes a big difference over time.

Other proposals to shore up the income and retirement security of historically overlooked segments of society deserve serious consideration. One is to create a "caregiver credit" to counteract Social Security's consistent shortchanging of women. Although retirement benefits are based on the best-paid 35 years of one's working life, women on average spend only 27 years in the workforce. Why? Because they tend to spend years raising children or caring for elderly or disabled family members. Social Security counts those years as big zeros, wage-wise, which translates into lower benefits.

"Instead of having zeros, she should have something," says Terry O'Neill, president of the National Organization for Women. One common proposal backed by NOW and other women's groups would be to assign caregiver years a value equivalent to half the median wage for full-time work, which is about $41,000.

Now that we've been regaled for weeks by politicians paying lip service to the valor and value of women working in the home, this one should be easy, right? In a sane political world, Democrats and Republicans alike would be falling all over themselves to put their money where their mouths are. So here's an idea: Next time Mitt Romney or Barack Obama waves to the crowds from the I'm-for-motherhood parade float, let's get them on the record in support of the caregiver credit.

Another underserved group is students. Since 1939, Social Security has supported dependents or survivors of disabled or deceased workers up to the age of 19 if they were in school. In 1965, Congress added benefits for those in school or college through age 21. But it took them away in 1981 as part of a Reagan administration cost-cutting move.

Since college graduates earn 60% to 70% more than high school graduates over their lifetimes on average, keeping kids in college would easily pay for itself. "That should be a no-brainer," says Thomas N. Bethell, visiting scholar at the national Academy of Social Insurance. Brave words, considering the brainlessness of much of the Social Security debate in Washington.

Modernizing Social Security is crucial today because the actions of government and industry have increased Americans' dependence on the program. Defined-benefit pensions, which inoculated retirement security from investment risk, have been on a trend line to extinction since 1980, when 38% of all private sector workers were covered. Today the figure is 20% and falling.

They've been supplanted by defined-contribution plans such as 401(k) accounts, into which workers place a certain amount per paycheck (sometimes augmented by an employer contribution), and cross their fingers that the investment markets won't abscond with their retirement dreams. But 401(k)s haven't proved to be up to the challenge. The average balance for workers in their 60s is less than $160,000. That sounds like a lot, but it won't bring you a happy retirement. If you use it to buy an annuity that will pay off through your and your spouse's lifetime, it would produce annual income of about $8,400; add inflation protection of up to 3% annually, and you start with less than $5,500 a year. (I used the federal employee Thrift Savings Plan's annuity calculator to crunch the numbers.) By contrast, Social Security is a lifetime benefit, protected from inflation no matter how fast prices rise.

Undoubtedly you're going to hear that improving Social Security will bankrupt America. This is the mating cry of the haves-and-want-mores, and it's malarkey. Federal taxes — personal, corporate and excise combined — amounted to about 15.4% of our gross national product last year, according to the Office of Management and Budget. That's lower than the level of every other industrialized country, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Isn't it curious that the same people who insist that America is the greatest, richest country in the world, ever, are those who insist that there's no way we can afford to provide for our elderly, our disabled and the survivors of our deceased workers to the same degree as the rest of the industrialized world?

The received wisdom among political insiders is that today's hyper-partisan atmosphere in Washington makes any talk of raising Social Security benefits a non-starter. But maybe this is exactly the moment to turn the conversation around. Every member of Congress will be out on the stump, along with the leaders of their parties, facing the voters.

"This is an important thing for constituents to be talking to their candidates about," NOW's O'Neill says. "Are you with us, or are you against us — that's the question."


March/April 2012 Newsletter
Mar 08, 2012

March / April 2012

Brothers and Sisters:

I know that some of you snow lovers don’t care for it, but it has been a super Winter as far as I am concerned. Don’t forget that Daylight Savings Time is March 11. (This is when you set your clocks forward.) St. Paddy’s Day is March 17, and the first day of Spring (yeah) is March 20. In April, we have Easter on the 8th, and that dreaded tax day this year is April 17. We have an extra bowling date that had to be added because of our bowling banquet. It will be Monday, March 19.

The Spring Golf Tournament will be held on April 21 at Queenstown Harbor on the Eastern Shore. Contact the Union Hall for more information. Remember that in the past, retirees have won this tournament! Hope to see you there.

The Fund office has asked me to remind you that it is important that you inform them of any address or phone number changes. Their number is (443) 573-3632.

Here's good info on buying American-made products: Some of the easiest - and most inexpensive - ways to buy American are in areas where the consumer is really indifferent as to which product to buy. The good news is that when it comes to simple, everyday items like soap, deodorant, or cotton swabs, usually any product will do since the price difference is usually negligible. The even better news is that sometimes it's even cheaper to buy American than not. So here are eleven easy ways to buy American in 2012 using the money you're already going to spend anyway.

  • Cotton Swabs - Don't call them Q-Tips. The Q-Tips brand is made in America, but guess what? The company that owns the brand isn't American at all. The name of the company is called Unilever (ever seen Lever 2000 soap?), which is a joint venture between England and The Netherlands. An American alternative would be the CVS or Walgreen's brand, which are both made in the USA as well, for about the same price. Both CVS and Walgreen's are American-owned companies and are based in the United States.
  • Deodorant - Suave and Dove are both owned by Unilever, so the profits go overseas and the taxes are paid overseas to foreign governments when you buy either of these brands. Want an American brand to buy, and save money, too? Go to the Dollar Tree store and buy the Speed Stick brand for $1, which is made in the USA by American-owned Colgate Palmolive. If you drop five or ten dollars, you won't have to go back to the store for this item anytime soon.
  • Bath Soap - Irish Spring sounds like it might be foreign, but it's actually an American brand made in the United States. Ivory soap is American, too. Jergens is made in America, but Jergens is owned by a Japanese company. Think of it like this: Just like a Toyota made in the U.S. is still a Japanese car, a bar of Jergens soap made in the U.S. is still a Japanese soap. Dial is owned by a German company.
  • Mustard - French's mustard isn't French. It's owned by the British. Grey Poupon sounds like it might be foreign, but it's owned by an American company, and is made in America.
  • Pasta sauce - Did you know Ragu is owned by Unilever, the foreign-owned company we learned about in the first two examples? Prego is an American brand owned by the Campbell Soup Company, and is made in the United States.
  • Disinfectant - Lysol and Clorox are both effective disinfectants and there is little if any price difference between the two, but only one is American owned. Lysol used to be owned by Kodak, but Kodak sold it to a British company in 1995. Clorox is American owned.
  • Coffee - Two of the most popular brands in the United States are Maxwell House and Taster's Choice, but only one is owned by a company based in the United States. Taster's Choice is made by Switzerland-based Nestle, the largest food company in the world. Maxwell House is an American brand. The coffee beans for both brands are imported, however. For truly American coffee from tree to cup (the beans come from Hawaii), check out the USA Coffee Company at www.USACoffeeCompany.com.
  • Cosmetics - Revlon is an American-owned company and many (not all) of their products are made in the United States. Maybelline was American-owned until 1996 when French-owned L'Oreal bought the company for $758 million.
  • Bottled water - Now that we know the French own at least one brand many probably thought was American owned, what other popular brands are owned by companies based in France? You might be surprised to know that Dannon bottled water (and other Dannon products like yogurt) are French owned. Aquafina (owned by Pepsi) and Dasani (owned by Coca Cola) are American brands.
  • Peanut Butter - They say choosy mothers choose Jif. Choosy patriotic Americans choose Jif, too, because Jif is American owned. Skippy is owned by our favorite foreign brand, Unilever.
  • Apparel - Why shop at Wal-Mart and buy foreign-made tee shirts when you can buy American-made tee shirts from All American Clothing Company? (www.AllAmericanClothing.com) where they use 100% U.S.-grown cotton for just $7.99. Are the shirts in Wal-Mart that much cheaper? I have to admit I don't know, because I don't shop there. But I do know Wal-Mart is the biggest seller of Chinese-made goods on the planet.

Okay, I had to give another example because this is probably the best one. Swiss Miss is American owned, but Carnation is owned by the Swiss. The good news is that the more we buy American-owned and American-made products, the more powerful and positive impact we will have on the U.S. economy. And the even better news is we can usually do it without any extra cost or inconvenience to the consumer. Awareness is the key.

Remember to purchase some of the 3, 2, 1 and baskets of cheer tickets.

New Members: Roland Hall, Charles Stevens, Wilbur Henderson and Joseph R. Bezelik

Sick members: Steve Golwacki, Milt Stapf, Jesse Artis, Ray Bingel, John Dehn, Lawrence Hopson, Perry Conway

Deceased members: James Chaney

Remember to keep these members in your thoughts and prayers.

The next meetings will be on March 15, 2012, and April 19, 2012, in the Sullivan Hall, Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD 21223. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m., the Executive Board meets at 10:00 a.m., and the General Meeting begins at 11:00 a.m. A light lunch is served following the General Meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney
President


Spring 2012 Golf Outing
Mar 08, 2012

Members and Retirees

Saturday
April 21, 2012

QUEENSTOWN HARBOR LAKES COURSE

310 Links Lane, Queenstown, Maryland 21658

8:30 a.m. Shotgun Start

Entry Fee: $60
(Includes green fee, cart, range balls, gift, lunch and prizes)

Proper attire is required on the course

Entry fee and application
must be returned to the Local Office no later than

April 13, 2012

Make checks payable to: 
Teamsters Local 355 Golf Outing

Mail to: 
1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD 21223
Atten: Dues Department

Application is available for downloading below


Download: spring 2012 golf application.pdf

2011 Christmas Party
Jan 18, 2012

Jan. 18, 2012 | Local 355's Association of Retired Members held their annual Christmas party, held December 15, 2011 at the UAW Hall in Baltimore, was by all accounts the largest and best the club has hosted. More than 250 retirees and guests enjoyed delicious food, dancing, raffles, and the ever-popular Cake Wheel. Retiree member Stan Pietrowski provided photos for your viewing pleasure.

 


November/December 2011 Newsletter
Nov 14, 2011
Brothers and Sisters,  To all of our veterans, a special thank you for serving our country. To those of you who have family members serving in the Armed Forces, tell them that they are being thought of every day by all of us, and thanks a million. Go to www.militarywallet.com for information on free meals and discounts this Friday, Veterans Day, November 11.
A.R.M. Executive Board 2011
Nov 07, 2011

Local 355's Association of Retired Members (ARM) installed officers and trustees to a new 3-year term during its September membership meeting in Baltimore.

The committee coordinates the Association's annual events and membership meetings.

The group is an important extension (arm) of the Local, providing support and assistance for the Local's officers, agents and members, and provides maintenance of the Baltimore building and grounds.

 



L-R: (Seated) Vice President Joe Reichert (Sysco); President Bob Eney (UPS); Treasurer Frank Supiot (Reliable Liquor). (Standing) Trustee Ray Bularz (UPS); Secretary Mike Brett (UPS); Sgt. of Arms Frank Barnett (JP Food Service); Trustee Ron Cain (UPS); Trustee Mel Holden (UPS); Trustee Tom Miskimon (UPS).


Social Security Increase January 2012
Oct 19, 2011

Social Security to hand out first raises since '09

Via Associated Press

October 19, 2011 | Social Security recipients will get a raise in January -- their first increase in benefits since 2009. It's expected to be about 3.5 percent.

Some 55 million beneficiaries will find out for sure Wednesday when a government inflation measure that determines the annual cost-of-living adjustment is released.

Congress adopted the measure in the 1970s, and since then it has resulted in annual benefit increases averaging 4.2 percent. But there was no COLA in 2010 or 2011 because inflation was too low. That was small comfort to the millions of retirees and disabled people who have seen retirement accounts dwindle and home values drop during the period of economic weakness, said David Certner, legislative policy director for the AARP.

"People certainly feel like they are falling behind, and these are modest income folks to begin with, so every dollar counts," Certner said. "I think sometimes people forget what seniors' incomes are."

Some of the increase in January will be lost to higher Medicare premiums, which are deducted from Social Security payments. Medicare Part B premiums for 2012 are expected to be announced next week, and the trustees who oversee the program are projecting an increase.

Monthly Social Security payments average $1,082, or about $13,000 a year. A 3.5 percent increase would amount to an additional $38 a month, or about $455 a year.

Most retirees rely on Social Security for a majority of their income, according to the Social Security Administration. Many rely on it for more than 90 percent of their income.

Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Analytics, said the COLA would give a boost to consumer spending next year, amounting to about $25 billion in government support, or 0.2 percent more economic growth, if beneficiaries spend it all. For comparison, last year's 2 percentage point cut in Social Security payroll taxes was worth $115 billion to U.S. households.

"It is not a magic bullet for the economy, but it will certainly be a positive for households on fixed incomes," he said.

Federal law requires the program to base annual payment increases on the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W). Officials compare inflation in the third quarter of each year -- the months of July, August and September -- with the same months in the previous year.

If consumer prices increases from year to year, Social Security recipients automatically get higher payments, starting the next January. If price changes are negative, the payments stay unchanged.
Only twice since 1975 -- the past two years -- has there been no COLA.

Wednesday's COLA announcement will come as a special joint committee of Congress weighs options to reduce the federal government's $1.3 trillion budget deficit. In talks this summer, President Barack Obama floated the idea of adopting a new measure of inflation to calculate the COLA, one that would reduce the annual increases.

Advocates for seniors mounted an aggressive campaign against the proposal, and it was scrapped. But it could resurface in the ongoing talks.

"We're very concerned about that," said Web Phillips of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. "I think that what this illustrates is the dangers of trying to make Social Security policy in the context of deficit reduction."

Social Security payments increased by 5.8 percent in 2009, the largest increase in 27 years, after energy prices spiked in 2008. But energy prices quickly dropped and home prices became soft in markets across the country, contributing to lower inflation the past two years.

For example, average gasoline prices topped $4 a gallon in the summer of 2008. But by January 2009, they had fallen below $2. Today, the national average is about $3.46 a gallon.

"A lot of that increase had to do with energy," Polina Vlasenko, an economist at the American Institute for Economic Research, based in Great Barrington, Mass., said of the 2009 change.

As a result, Social Security recipients got an increase that was far larger than actual overall inflation. However, they weren't to get another increase until consumer prices exceeded the levels measured in 2008.

So far this year, prices have been higher than that, Vlasenko said. Based on consumer prices in July and August, the COLA for 2012 would be about 3.5 percent. Vlasenko estimates the COLA will be from 3.5 percent to 3.7 percent.

Advocates for seniors say it's about time.

"If you've been at the grocery store lately and remember what you used to pay for things, see what you're paying for things today," Phillips said. "The cost-of-living adjustment makes sure that the Social Security benefit that you qualify for when you retire or you become disabled continues to stay current with prices so that the buying power of your benefit does not decline over time."


Local 507 Retirees: Giving Back, Getting More
Sep 21, 2011

They might be retired from work but that doesn’t mean they’re retired from life.

Retirees from Local 507 in Cleveland make it a point to be active, involved and engaged—especially when it comes to issues that affect their union brothers and sisters. When Ohio needed 230,000 signatures to repeal SB5, the anti-worker legislation on the November ballot, Teamster retirees helped collect the 1.3 million signatures that were delivered. And they’re at it again.

On September 15, more than 400 retirees attended a quarterly luncheon where they heard from state Sen. Tom Patton and learned what they could to do stop voter suppression. “The message I took away from Sen. Patton is it doesn’t matter if you’re Republican or Democrat. It’s about doing the right thing,” said Local 507 retiree Charles Smith. “Tom Patton comes from a working background and he fights for working families. That’s what’s important.”

Read the full story at TeamsterMagazine.com


July/August 2011 Newsletter
Jul 07, 2011

Brothers and Sisters:

   I hope that you had a great and safe 4th of July.
   Upon the observance of the 235th birthday of our nation, we are finding it much more difficult to purchase products made in the USA. Here are a few websites I found to help us deal with this: www.theunionshop.org, www.unionmade.com, and www.americansworking.com. You can use Google, Bing or Yahoo search engines to find other sites.
   The Executive Board thanks you for voting us in for another 2- year term. We bid our long time treasurer Ed Jackson a heartfelt thank you for all the years of unwavering service he has provided this retirees club. We will miss Ed at our meetings and at bowling. Ed and his lovely wife Agnes have decided that now is a good time to do the traveling that they’ve been putting off for too long. We welcome Frank Supiot as our new treasurer. Frank has been a long time trustee and will do a great job as our new treasurer. We also welcome Tom Miskimon as our newest trustee.
   The hall for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Oldham Street. It’s near the corner of S. Oldham Street and O’Donnell Street, right behind the BP station and the next road from the Royal Farm Store. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O’Donnell Street exit of Route 895 (old tunnel).
   The summer party will be on August 18 and the Christmas party will be December 15. There are some changes that have been made: (1) The hours for the parties are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (instead of noon to 4 p.m.) and (2) no one will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the beginning of the party. Start sending your envelopes in. They have to be received by August 8 and December 5, respectively.

   New Members: N/A

   Sick Members: Steve Glowacki

   Deceased Members: Arthur James (Cargill/National Molasses); Cyrus Schierzka (W.T. Cowan)

   Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

   The next meeting will be on July 21 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. There will be no August meeting as the summer party will be in its place. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney, President


May/June 2011 Newsletter
Jul 07, 2011

Brothers and Sisters:

   May is here in all its splendid glory, with summer rolling in on June 21.
   In May we have Mothers Day. We also have, on May 21, Armed Forces Day. It is a day to pay tribute to men and women who serve in the United States armed forces. This year we say a special thanks to the members of the U.S. Navy “Seals” for the great job they just did. At the end of the month, on May 30, we celebrate Memorial Day--a day of remembrance for those who have died serving our country.
   In June we have Flag Day on the 14th and Fathers Day on the 19th.
   Brother Willie Morrison is getting together a 12-night Southern Caribbean cruise leaving Baltimore on February 6, 2012. You can go to the Royal Caribbean website and check out the itinerary, or call Willie at 410-465-1529 and he will give you all the information about who to contact. Remember, while we are sharing this information as a favor to Willie, the Retirees Club and Teamsters Local 355 are not endorsing this cruise.
   Check out our website (www.Teamsters355.com). Suggestions for items of interest and information you would like to see on the site are always welcome.
   The May meeting was the last Sunday meeting for Local 355 until September (we will still have our retirees meetings every third Thursday of the month). At this meeting, the retirees always hold a cookout for the members. A special thanks goes out to Stan Pietrowski, Calvin Duley, Frank Supiot, Will Sank, Ray Bularz, Tom Miskimon, Ron Cain, Rich Parker and Ed Wetherbee for another great job.
   Please inform us about any member that is sick or who has passed away, so we can keep everyone up to date.

   New Members: Ron Ritter, Jesse Parker

   Sick Members: Steve Glowacki

   Deceased Members: John Kirschke, Frank Kline, Louis Haigia, Herbert Sprinkle

   Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

   The next meetings will be on May 19 and June 16 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney, President


Cut Waste and Fraud, Not Medicare
Jun 24, 2011

Medicare was billed $116 million for off-label antipsychotics used to dope nearly 1 in 7 nursing home residents, mostly for dementia

By TERRY J. ALLEN
In These Times.com

[June 24, 2011] - Up to 30 percent of U.S. health care expenditures are wasteful, Medicare’s chief actuary estimates, and Medicare could trim up to $150 billion from its $500 billion 2010 tab without harming care. Here are some low-hanging billions in waste and fraud and poor practices.

  • Punish Pharma Phraud The $4 billion worth of medical-related fraud the feds recaptured last year is presumably a fraction of the taxpayer-subsidized scams that pharma got away with. The top 10 federal False Claims Act settlements in 2010 involved health care, with pharmaceutical company fraud accounting for eight.
  • Kill Pay to Delay When patents are expiring, drug companies pay off other firms to delay marketing cheaper generics. According to the Federal Trade Commission, the deals raise costs for consumers, including Medicare and Medicaid, by $3.5 billion a year.
  • Don’t Dope for Dementia Most of the antipsychotic prescriptions Medicare paid for in the first half of 2007 were “erroneous,” the Health and Human Services inspector general found. During that period, Medicare was billed $116 million for off-label use of antipsychotics to dope nearly 1 in 7 nursing home residents, mostly for dementia. Not tested for or known to ameliorate dementia, the antipsychotics were promoted by companies that paid kickbacks to doctors, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services reported.
  • Mandate Infection Controls About 1 in 10 hospital patients acquire infections that cause preventable deaths and create $6.7 billion to $11 billion a year in extra costs.
  • Bargain For Drug Prices Congress barred Medicare and Medicaid from negotiating bulk discount rates, thereby funneling an estimated $14 billion a year from taxpayers to drug companies.
  • You’d Better Shop Around Drug companies charge Americans far more for brand-name meds than much of the world pays. If U.S. consumers paid the same as Canadians (rather than 38 percent more), they would have saved $50 billion in 2003, Boston University researchers found.
  • Cut DTC Advertising Only the United States and New Zealand allow direct-to-consumer drug ads. U.S. health care and pharma laid out $4.5 billion in 2009 for DTC.
  • Bar Office Visits Each day, 100,000 pharma reps visit America’s 311,000 office-based physicians to influence drug choice through perks and junkets at a cost of $19 billion a year.
  • Revamp FDA Drug Approval Require that new drugs be tested not only against placebos, but against existing treatments. For example, it turns out Avastin ($50 per injection) was little different from Lucentis ($2,000 a shot) for treating macular degeneration. In 2008, 480,000 Avastin shots cost Medicare $20 million, while only 337,000 shots of Lucentis totaled $537 million.
  • Make Polluters Pay Prevention through lifestyle change is good, and it’s fun to watch Michelle Obama dance and garden, but it’s better to punitively fine industrial polluters and force them to curb the use of environmental toxins linked to asthma, heart disease, mental retardation and cancer.
  • Implement Evidence-Based Testing Expensive and often invasive diagnostics can do more harm than good. The New York Times reported that in 2009, Medicare paid doctors more than $100 million for nearly 550,000 colonoscopies—with 40 percent going to patients over 75 for whom routine screening is neither safe nor effective. Medicare spent more than $50 million in 2008 on equally ill-advised routine screening for prostate cancer in men 75 and older, and for cervical cancer screening in women 65 and older with previously normal Pap smears. Medicare pays $1.6 billion on drug-coated cardiac stents, when studies show them no more effective in preventing heart attacks or death than drugs or lifestyle changes.
  • Regulate BigPharma Profits BigPharma justifies its massive profits by arguing that a new drug costs $1.32 billion to develop. But after government grants and tax breaks, the real figure is $55 million.

Public funding should trigger profit limits. Add savings like these to the elimination of tax breaks for rich individuals and corporations, and U.S. health care will get a lot healthier.


Consumers Don't Drive Health Care Costs
May 13, 2011

It’s the Prices, Stupid.

By Richard Kirsch
New Deal 2.0

   Republican plans that shift costs to consumers completely misunderstand the United States’ health care system.

   Yesterday, Speaker Boehner issued what Robert Bob Borosage of Campaign for America’s Future correctly labeled extortion: “Give us trillions in cuts in Medicare and Medicaid or we blow up the economy.” Boehner’s threat to tie the lifting of the debt ceiling to trillions of cuts in spending would force huge cuts in Medicare and Medicaid.

   Actually, there are no health care cost savings in the Ryan-Boehner budget, just cost shifts. The Ryan budget cuts Medicare by shifting more than $6,000 a year to each senior who benefits from it. It shifts Medicaid costs to state taxpayers by cutting federal funding to states for the program.

   While the extremes of the Ryan-Boehner budget have been widely decried, the underlying assumption behind their Medicare privatization plan is too often accepted by a broad array of health policy advisers. The Ryan budget assumes that the problem with health costs is that consumers don’t pay enough out of pocket for care and that plans are too generous. Unfortunately, that’s also been the view of some Democratic health policy advisers. White House officials backed the taxation of higher cost health plans in the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and others like former Clinton OMB Director Alice Rivlin support a less draconian version of Medicare privatization.

   But the reason that health care costs so much in the United States is not that we consume too much health care; it’s that we pay too much for what we consume.* As Uwe Reinhardt and three other health economists summarized succinctly after comparing the prices we pay and the amount of health care we use in the United States with other developed countries, “It’s the prices, stupid.”

   For example, we make one-third fewer doctor visits a year than people in other countries but we pay an average of $59 for an office visit, compared with $31 in France. Our doctors make a lot more money than their colleagues in other countries. Adjusting pay across countries by purchasing power, U.S. doctors get paid about two times as much as in others. A Congressional Research Service analysis found that specialists in the United States are paid about $50,000 a year more than would be predicted, even considering the higher level of wealth in the United States.

   We go to the hospital a lot less, too, and when we’re there we don’t stay as long. But we pay a lot more. The average hospital stay costs us $3,181, compared with $837 in Canada. We do get a lot more MRIs in the United States, more than twice as much as other countries, and we also pay a lot more for each scan: an average of $1,200 compared to $839 in Germany. And as everyone knows, the price of brand-name prescription drugs is much higher in the United States than other countries.

   Why do we pay so much more for the same product? The biggest reason is that other countries understand that health care is a public good, not a commodity. Markets can’t control health care prices, since it is health care providers who decide what care is delivered. When providers determine both demand and supply, market economics don’t apply.

   Even in the United States, with all the political pressure from the doctor, hospital, and drug lobbies, we can see how a public insurance entity does a better job of controlling prices than private insurance. Medicare sets prices and pays $500 for an MRI, less than half the $1,200 U.S. average. Even with its older patients, Medicare pays $2,200 for an average hospital stay, almost 50% less than the U.S. average.

   Private insurance companies not only fail to control prices, they add costs. The private insurance companies that Ryan wants to hand Medicare over to are the primary reason that we spend more than four times as much on administrative and insurance costs in the United States as other countries.

   Which brings us to another market-driven argument that underlies the Ryan proposal and other conservative nostrums for controlling health care costs: that because Americans have insurance they are not prudent purchasers of health coverage. Again, the international comparison should put this to rest, as in all those other countries with much lower health spending everyone is fully covered. In these countries, the only prudent purchaser is the government, which is responsible for getting lower prices. As it is, the amount that Americans pay out-of-pocket for health care is already a lot more than consumers in other developed countries, even accounting for our higher incomes.

   The Obama budget plan begins to address the root causes of high health care costs by increasing the authority of a new public entity designed to control what Medicare pays for health care. The President contrasted his budget approach with that of the Republican budget in his April 13th budget address at George Washington University, saying: “Their plan essentially lowers the government’s health care bills by asking seniors and poor families to pay them instead. Our approach lowers the government’s health care bills by reducing the cost of health care itself.”

   The centerpiece of Obama’s plan to control Medicare costs is to add additional powers to a new body established under the ACA called the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB). The IBAP will function as a kind of military base closing commission for Medicare. If the growth in Medicare costs exceeds a target amount, then it would institute cost control measures that would go into effect unless Congress intervened. Since cutting eligibility and benefits are not part of the IPAB mandate, cost savings would have to come from the actual drivers of cost: the prices paid for services and the way health care services are delivered.

   Obama’s budget proposal would strengthen the IPAB’s current authority, although the details of how to do that have not yet been specified. As you can imagine, it is already a target of attack from health care providers who are finding a sympathetic ear among both Republicans and Democrats in Congress. It’s also a favorite target of the right, which calls it “Obama’s death panel.”

   The battle being fought over Medicare is, like every other economic issue that faces the nation, a matter of power and a test of our democracy. We can control health care costs and improve the quality of care by addressing the root causes: our market-driven health care system pays too much for care and rewards quantity over quality. But changing the way we finance and pay for health care will mean putting the interest of consumers over the power of the industry lobby. For the doctors, hospitals, drug companies, medical device manufacturers and insurance companies, a dollar saved is a dollar lost in revenue.

   The firestorm of popular opposition to the Ryan Medicare plan is because he chose to side with industry over seniors. But with Boehner threatening to hold the economy hostage, and a health industry that has enormous lobbying clout, the future of our nation’s national health insurance system for seniors and the disabled remains in grave doubt.

Richard Kirsch is a Senior Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, whose book on the campaign to win reform will be published in 2012. He was National Campaign Manager of Health Care for America Now during the legislative battle to pass reform.

*In 2000 the United States spent considerably more on health care than any other country, whether measured per capita or as a percentage of GDP. At the same time, most measures of aggregate utilization such as physician visits per capita and hospital days per capita were below the OECD median. Since spending is a product of both the goods and services used and their prices, this implies that much higher prices are paid in the United States than in other countries. But U.S. policymakers need to reflect on what Americans are getting for their greater health spending. They could conclude: It’s the prices, stupid. ~ HealthAffairs.org

 


March/April 2011 Newsletter
Mar 24, 2011

March/April 2011  

Brothers and Sisters:

   Well, it looks like Spring is almost here, with the first calendar day being March 20. Don’t forget to set your clocks forward on March 13!
   The Teamsters Local 355 Spring Golf Tournament is scheduled for April 16 at Queenstown Harbor (Lakes Course), Queenstown, MD. Entry fee of $60 and application is due in by April 8th.  You can get more information here, or you can call the Union Hall.
   Sister Nona Kratzen-Hott is putting together a 12-night Southern Caribbean cruise leaving Baltimore on February 27, 2012. You can go to the Royal Caribbean website and check out the itinerary, or call Nona at 410-679-8057 and she will give you all the information about who to contact. Remember, while we are sharing this information as a favor to Nona, the Retirees Club and Teamsters Local 355 are not endorsing this cruise.
   Don’t forget about our makeup bowling date on Monday, March 28th.
   Lesley Phillips, who handles the Local 355 website, requests that retirees contribute whatever Teamster items they may have that could have historical value (and that they're willing to part with). You can drop the items off at the Hall and mark them for her attention. Lesley will make sure the items are well taken care of and preserved for posterity's sake. While you’re at it, check out the website (www.Teamsters355.com). Suggestions for items of interest and information you would like to see on the site are always welcome.
   Please inform us about any member that is sick or who has passed away, so we can keep everyone up to date.           

Sick Members:  John Kirschke, Steve Glowacki, Frank Barnett, John Romm     

Deceased Members: Charlie Leake  

Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.     

   The next meetings will be on March 17 and April 21 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD.  Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.                                       

Fraternally,

Bob Eney,
President


What Retirees Should Watch for in 2011
Feb 02, 2011

Cross-posted from afl-cio NOW BLOG

By Barbara J Easterling
President
Alliance of Retired Americans

   I believe there are two issues retirees should pay attention to in 2011.

   First, Social Security. Last year it celebrated 75 years of keeping seniors out of poverty, but some in Congress see it differently. John Boehner, the new House Speaker, wants us to raise the retirement age to 70. The new Budget Committee chair, Rep. Paul Ryan, wants to cut benefits and turn a privatized system over to Wall Street. Rep. Michele Bachmann, the tea party leader, says Social Security is a “tremendous fraud” and thinks we should “wean” current workers away from it. Even though Social Security has not added a penny to our budget deficit, many on Capitol Hill want to balance the budget on the backs of seniors.

   Second, we must protect Medicare. The 2010 health care reform law will help 46 million seniors better afford to see a doctor and fill a prescription. Despite that, there will be a number of efforts in Congress to repeal the new law. Please urge your elected officials to not raise prescription drug costs, take away free preventive screenings for life-threatening diseases or stop a plan to help families with the costs of long-term care. In my opinion, not enough people know how health reform helps them, and this lack of awareness fuels the repeal movement. If we want to keep these new benefits, we must do more to educate our friends and neighbors.

   Seniors are increasingly the target of scare tactics and misinformation about these issues, and many retirees tell me how confused they are. In 2011, the Alliance for Retired Americans will do everything we can to help seniors separate fact from fiction.

Ms. Easterling was previously the secretary-treasurer if the Communications Workers of America.

For more information, visit www.retiredamericans.org or call 1-800-333-7212.

 


January/February 2011 Newsletter
Jan 18, 2011

 

Brothers and Sisters:

   First off, let me wish everyone a Happy New Year.
   The Christmas party was a smash hit. We had one of the best turnouts ever. The food and the hall were awesome. A special thanks to the executive committee for doing another spectacular job. The only bad part was Mother Nature hitting us with the snow.
   Thanks to each and every one of you who provided cakes for the cake wheel. It was a huge success. Thanks to Mike Krainer and his crew for all their help. I am not naming them, because I know I will leave someone out, but you know who you are.
   Congratulations to John Cook for winning the basket of cheer, and to the Prunty family who won the 50/50.
   Congratulations to the following people who won the 3,2,1 drawing at the general meeting in December:

First prize: Frank Supiot
Second prize: Lee Rausch
Third prize, John Carroll.

New Members: Benedict Falice
Sick Members: John Kirschke, Steve Glowacki, Bart Wright, Frank Barnett.
Deceased Members: William Matthews (Mason Dixon)
   Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

   The next meetings will be on January 20 and February 17 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland Street, Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,
Bob Eney, President


November/December 2010 Newsletter
Jan 10, 2011

Remember to VOTE!

Brothers and Sisters,

 Some very important dates are coming up soon.

  • November 2 is Election Day
  • November 11 is Veterans Day
  • November 25 is Thanksgiving Day
  • December 6 is the cut off date for your envelopes to be received for the Christmas party
  • December 16 is the Christmas party
  • December 25 is Christmas Day

  Congratulations to fellow Teamster retirees Henry Rutledge, Ken Brown, Bob Schultz and Vernon Williams for winning the Fall Teamster golf outing. This is the second year in a row that retired members have won this event! Hope to see you at the Spring outing. We can still use some more bowlers.
   To all of our veterans, a special thank you for serving our country. To those of you who have family members serving in the Armed Forces, tell them that they are being thought of every day by all of us, and thanks a million.
   Teamsters Local 355 has a great web site for you to check out-- http://teamsters355.com/. Click on the retirees and photos links and the Teamster History Archived at George Washington University. Our Local is trying to gather past information for the Local 355 archives. If you have any Local collectibles or history you would like to share, please contact the Local.
160   The new hall for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Oldham Street. It's near the corner of South Oldham Street and O’Donnell Street, right behind the BP station. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O’Donnell Street exit of Route 895 (old tunnel). The Christmas party will be held on December 16.
   There are some changes that have been made: (1) The hours for the parties are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (instead of noon to 4 p.m.), and (2) NO ONE will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the start of the party. Start getting your envelopes in. Remember that your check is for $25 if one person and $50 if 2 people. You will get your check back at the party. They have to be received by December 6. There will be a cake wheel and a money wheel. We need volunteers for both of the wheels. Please bring cakes for the cake wheel, and thank you in advance.

MENU

  • Steamed Shrimp
  • Top Round Beef on the Pit 
  • Sweet Honey Ham on the Pit
  • Sweet Italian Sausage on the Pit
  • Homemade Maryland Crab Soup
  • Shrimp Creole
  • Creamy Whipped Garlic & Parsley Potatoes
  • BBQ Chicken
  • Sweet Corn Casserole
  • Sauerkraut & Kielbasa
  • Greek Salad with Fresh Feta
  • Homemade Pasta Salad
  • Assorted Cheese Platters
  • Chips & Pretzels
  • Assortment of Breads & Rolls for the Pit items
  • All Fixin’s & Condiments
  • Assorted Sheetcakes ~ Coffee
  • Draft Beer (Budweiser & Miller Light)
  • Non alcoholic beer
  • Soda~Coffee~Ice Tea~Lemonade~Bottled Water

   Please be sure to purchase some of the 3, 2, 1 and baskets of cheer tickets!

  • New Members: Benedict Falice (UPS), John Mayola (Cons. Freight)      
  • Sick members: John Kirschke, Steve Golwacki and Frank Barnett

   Remember to keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

   The next meeting will be on Nov 18, 2010, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Remember, there will be no meeting in December due to the Christmas party. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m., the Executive Board meets at 10:00 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11:00 a.m. A light lunch is served following the general meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally,

Bob Eney President


September/October 2010 Newsletter
Sep 09, 2010

Brothers and Sisters,

   I hope you all had a happy and safe Labor Day.
   Bowling starts Wednesday, September 8th at 10 a.m. Please be there by 9:30. New bowlers are welcome. The bowling alley is Glenn Burnie Bowl, 6322 Ritchie Highway in Glen Burnie (at Ritchie Highway and the Beltway). 
   The Fall Golf Tournament is September 25th, and will be held at Westminster National (old Bear Creek) again this year. For information, please call the Union Hall.
   The Summer Party was excellent; the food was fantastic. Everyone that I talked to had a great time. Don't take my word for it! Ask a member who was there and they will tell you how nice it was. Congratulations to Ann and Bob Norman for winning the 50/50.
   If you couldn't make the party, be sure that you make the Christmas Party, which will be held December 16th. It will be even better!
   The new hall for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South O'Donnell Street, right behind the BP station. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O'Donnell Street exit of Route 895 (old tunnel). Please note: The hours for the parties are 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (formerly Noon to 4 p.m.). No one will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the start of the party.
   As mentioned above, the Christmas Party is scheduled for Thursday, December 16th. Start getting your envelopes in. They have to be received by December 6th. There will be a cake wheel and a money wheel. Please bring cakes for the wheel – and thank you in advance!

New members: n/a
Sick members: John Kirschke, Bob Kidd
Deceased members: n/a
Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

   Upcoming meetings: Tuesday, September 16th and Tuesday, October 21st in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S Dukeland Street in Baltimore. Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the general meeting begins at 11 a.m. followed by a light lunch. I hope to see you there. And please, remember to bring another retiree with you!

Fraternally,

Bob Eney
President


Is Your Check in The Mail?
Jun 29, 2010

   It is if you hit the Medicare prescription drug gap, commonly called the donut hole.
   The tax-free, one-time $250 rebate check is part of the Health Care Reform Implementation, and the first step towards closing the donut hole – the period during which retirees must pay for all of their prescription drugs.
   However, Teamster retirees who get prescription drug coverage directly from a Teamster Health & Welfare fund may not qualify for this benefit. That's because the coverage you already have is better than most Medicare Part D coverage.
   If you're not sure whether you qualify, please ask your plan administrator. 
   If you do qualify, you don't need to provide any personal information (such as Medicare, Social Security, or bank account numbers) to get the rebate check.
   Don't give your personal information to anyone who calls you about the $250 rebate check. Call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) to report anyone who calls you about it. TTY users should call 1-800-486-2048.

FAQs:

Why will some people be getting checks?
   Because the new health are reform law created a program to help retirees with the high cost of prescription drugs. The "Medicare Part D Coverage Gap Discount Program" pays $250 toward prescription drugs when participants reach the coverage gap or "donut hole." The program is for retirees eligible for Medicare.

What is the coverage gap?
   The coverage gap occurs when the total drug spending by the plan and the participant reaches $2,830, until the total out-of-pocket cost reaches $4,550. Many retired Teamsters actually have prescription drug coverage that is much better that Medicare Part D and do not have any coverage gap at all.

Who will get the check?
   Retirees who participate in a Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Program (PDP) or a Medicare Advantage Program with Prescription Drugs (MA-PD). Retirees won't get a check if they've enrolled in prescription drug programs that don't have a coverage gap.

What can I expect if I'm eligible to receive a check?
   You will receive a one-time, tax-free $250 rebate check in the mail. Beginning on January 1, 2011, you will receive a 50% discount on brand name drugs at the pharmacy once you reach the coverage gap.

How will I know if I've reached the coverage gap?
   The Explanation of Benefits notice, which your drug plan mails to you each month when you fill a prescription, will tell you how much you've spent on covered drugs and whether you've entered the coverage gap. If your PDP or MA-PD pays some of your costs during the coverage gap, you ill still receive a discount after you've reached the gap starting in January 1, 2011. However, the discount you receive will depend on how much your plan supplements your coverage during the coverage gap. The discount will be only on what you actually pay, and not on the full price of the drug.

Will I need to do anything to get this rebate check?
   No. There are no forms to fill out. Medicare will automatically send a check that's made out to you. You don;t need to provide any personal information – like your Medicare, Social Security, or bank account numbers to get the rebate check. Do NOT give your personal information to anyone who calls you about the $250 rebate check.

When will I get the rebate check?
   If you reach the coverage gap this year, you will receive a $250 check if you are not already receiving Medicare Extra Help. These checks started being mailed in mid-June. Checks will be mailed monthly throughout the year as beneficiaries enter the coverage gap. However, this is a one-time benefit. If you qualify, you will only receive one check after you reach the coverage gap.

Will I have to pay taxes on this rebate check?
   No. It is tax-free.

What if I don't get the check when I should?
   If you hit the donut hole after the program has begun, yu should receive your check within 45 days. Your rebate may be delayed if Medicare doesn't have information from your Medicare drug plan showing that you reached the coverage gap in time for mailing. You should call your Medicare drug plan to make sure all of your information has been sent to Medicare. 
   If you don't get your rebate check, contact Medicare at 1-800-MEDICARE. Individuals receiving Medicare Extra Help will not receive a rebate check. You can also make sure Social Security has your correct home address. Call 1-800-772-1213, or your local Social Security office. TTY users should call 1-800-325-0778.

Have other questions about the $250 rebate check or the Affordable Care Act and Medicare?
   You can visit www.medicare.gov, or call 1-800-MEDICARE.

– This information was provided to all locals by the IBT Communications Department.

Photo/Getty Images


May/June Newsletter
May 05, 2010

Brothers and Sisters:

   As you read this, the bowling season is coming to the end. We will have our bowling banquet on May 12. The banquet is for bowlers only, so think about joining us next season. Dates will be in upcoming newsletters.
   The Spring Gold Outing was held at Queenstown Harbor and we had 52 golfers sign up. (Pictures to come.)The Fall Outing will be announced at a later date.
   Weather permitting, we will be grilling outside for our May meeting.
   While on the subject of grilling, this past Sunday (May 2), the retirees did some bodacious outdoor cooking for the regular membership. This is an annual event that the retirees do at the last regular Sunday meeting before the summer break. (The regular meetings have always been canceled for the months of June, July and August.) A special thanks from me and the officers of Local 355 for a great job to all who worked their butts off. (More photos here.)
   At the April meeting, the retirees hosted IBT history Project staffers. To read more about this project, please go [here]. This very well done site has a retiree's link, as well as many other links for keeping informed about union matters.
   From the good news/bad news department:
   First the bad news. As I am sure that most of you have heard by now, after many years of having our Summer and Christmas parties at the Town and Country Hall in Lansdowne, we had to come up with a new place. This was done because of something beyond our control.
   The good news is that the retiree officers have come up with a very nice new hall where we are going to have the upcoming Summer and Christmas parties. The new hall is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Street, right next to the Farm Store. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit off of Route 95 (new tunnel) and the O'Donnell Street exit off of Route 895 (old tunnel). The Summer party will be August 19.
   The Christmas party will be December 16 and there are some changes to the schedule. First, the hours for the party are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (instead of Noon to 4 p.m.). Second, no one will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the start of the party.
   Start getting your envelopes in, as they have to be in by August 9 and December 9, respectively.
   The Triple Crown winners were: First place - Rusty Rinehart; Second Place - Don Fox; Third Place - Jesse Artis.

New members: James Hinton, Ralph Boarman, Sr., and Joe Michael
Sick members: Joe Gardner, Brett Scheibe, and John Kirschke
Deceased members: Donald Parks and John Mandley

Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

   Our next meetings will be on May 20, and June 17, 2010, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD. Coffee and donuts are served starting at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10:00 a.m. The General Meeting starts at 11:00 a.m. A light lunch will be served following the general meeting. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

 

Fraternally,                                                     

Bob Eney,  

ARM President

 

 


Retiree club hosts IBT history project staffers
Apr 20, 2010

   

Bart Wright shares pictures of his family's Cape Cod transport company with IBT archivist Tom Connors

 

   Members of the Teamsters Archives Project attended Local 355's Association of Retired Members (A.R.M.) monthly meeting April 15 to meet with retired Teamsters interested in sharing road stories and memorabilia with the International.
   IBT staff member Tom Connors, Archives Project of the Training and Development Department (left), Chicago-based writer/reporter Al Stein (below right), and information specialist and researcher David Piper (bottom), each explained their role in the six-month project, and what they hope to achieve.
   "Our work is to record history, your history, specifically during the glory days between 1945 and the 1970s at the height of the union's organizing campaigns, and the break-through achievement of a Master Freight Agreement." said Connors. "What are your stories? What do you remember of those times?"
   Recently the archivists were given two reel-to-reel tapes, the content of which was unknown. The International purchased a recorder to play the tapes, and watching it, they were amazed and excited: it was an original recording of Jimmy  Hoffa in front of a crowd of members, explaining the master freight agreement and what it meant to drivers. "He was explaining it without notes, apparently off the top of his head," said Connors.
   Among other discoveries have been pictures of team drivers with their horses and wagons, and stable hands and blacksmiths. "Images like these document the incredible diversity of Teamster members very early on."
   After lunch, the archivists spent a couple of hours listening to and recording members in the quiet of the local's conference room. Pleased to have connected with several retirees who want to continue telling their stories, A.R.M. president Bob Eney was assured that the project members will be back to continue the dialogue and collect more historically valuable information.
   The Teamsters is working on books about different aspects of the union's history. (For example, "100 Years of Teamsters History: A strong Legacy, A powerful Future," "Teamsters: Snapshots in Time" are just two recently published books that are available.) The union wants stories, photos and/or journals that could end up being in one of the history books and in the special collection in the Teamster archives.
   For more information, contact A.R.M. president Bob Eney at bobeney@yahoo.com, or Teamster historian Karin Jones at 202-624-8117.  


Photos by Stanley Pietrowski

 


March/April Newsletter
Feb 26, 2010

 Brothers and Sisters:

   Well, I guess it's safe to say that you are as fed up with this Winter weather as I am. It's looking better as we are getting closer to good weather with Spring training underway, and St. Paddy's day near. Even the first day of Spring will be here before you know it!   We have some bowling dates to make up due to the bad weather. The makeup dates will all be on Monday: March 1, 15, and 29. (Yes, Johnny. We will still be bowling on Wednesdays also.) The bowling banquet will be held on May 12 at the Union Hall from 12-4 p.m. Please remember that the banquet is for bowlers only.
   The Spring G
olf Tournament will be held on April 24 at Queenstown Harbour on the Eastern Shore. Start time is 8:30 a.m. Contact the Union Hall for more information. Remember that theretirees won the Fall tournament! Hope to see you there!
   Karin Jones, Communications & Outreach Coordinator for the Department of Training & Education of the IBT, will be ou
r guest speaker at out March meeting. She will talk to the members about what the IBT is doing about archiving Teamsters' history. So bring all your old paraphernalia and memorabilia, and tall stories. Some of the story telling will be recorded if you want. This should be fun!

For your information:

  • UPC barcode information - If he barcode begins with the numbers 690-695, the item was made in China. Buy things made in the USA.
  • The local's Web site is www.teamsters355.com. The retirees have a link on the Web page.
  • New members: Robert Piaskowski, ABF; George Cole, Allied Systems; Jerome Buckner, US Foods; and Joseph Patucci, Jones Motors. We now have 614 members in the Retirees Club.
  • Sick members: Willie Morrison and Joe Gardner.
  • Deceased members: Milford Purdham, Penske; Ken Beckhard, Sun Papers; George Linsemeye, Penske. Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

  The March meeting will be held Thursday, the 18th, and the April meeting on Thursday, the 15th, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 South Dukeland Street in Baltimore. Coffee and donuts are served beginning at 9:30 a.m. The general meeting begins at 11:00 a.m. A light lunch will be served following the general meeting.
   Remember to bring another retired member with you to the meetings. If Baltimore City schools are closed because of inclement weather, there will be no meeting that day.

Fraternally, 

Bob Eney,
President
   
 


2009 Retirees Christmas Party
Dec 18, 2009

'Tis the season for gala parties complete with good food and good friends, but this year's annual event sponsored by the Association of Retired Members of Local 355 and held at the Town & Country Hall in Lansdowne, might also be one for the record books. "We have 220 members and guests," said ARM president Bob Eney, who seemed to be in a dozen places at once as he moved through the banquet rooms and lobby checking to be sure that all was running smoothly. "I think this is the largest turnout ever!"

Guests enjoyed an extensive menu that included raw and fried oysters, crab soup and clam chowder; tossed salad; an assortment of cheese, crackers and rolls; stuffed chicken breast with gravy, pit ham, carved turkey and roast beef; red-bliss mashed potatoes, green beans and corn. 

Music was provided by Rod Clark, former high school teacher and currently a professor at Anne Arundel Community College, who enjoys DJ-ing for a hobby during academic breaks.

While some satiated their appetities, others played their luck (and their quarters) trying to win dessert: The Cake Wheel drew guests eager to take their chances to win one of the delightful and delicious-looking treats piled high nearby. All the baked goods and pastries wre donated by members, many of whom were vying for a cake win themselves.

All funds collected from the Cake Wheel, a 50-50 raffle and the Basket of Cheer raffle will replenish ARM's treasury.

The Christmas Party, a Local 355 retirees' event for over 25 years, is one of two annual parties sponsored by ARM. Don't miss their summer party. We'll post the date here as soon as it is set.

Photo gallery ...


Triple Crown Drawing Winners
Dec 16, 2009

Winners of the Triple Crown Drawing held at the December 6 local membership meeting in Baltimore are:

1st Prize ($300): Howard Johnson (pictured)

2nd Prize ($200): Ron Snyder

3rd Prize ($100): Arthur Jefferson

Congratulations to the winners, and thanks to everyone for their support!

 

 


July/August Newsletter
Jul 16, 2010

 

 

Brothers and Sisters,

   I hope you had a great and safe Fourth of July.

   Bowling starts Wednesday, September 8 at 10 a.m. Please be there by 9:30 a.m. New bowlers are welcome.
   I recently attended an Identity Theft Seminar put on by the Maryland State Police. Some of the topics covered were phishing (what is phishing?), international scams, how to protect your ID, obtaining and reading your credit report, and who to contact if you suspect ID theft. There is a website with details and more information on what to do if you experience these and related problems. Click here to go to the website.
   The new location for our parties is the UAW Hall at 1010 South Oldham Street. It is near the corner of S. Oldham Street and O'Donnell Street, right behind the BP station. The hall is right off the Boston Street exit of Route 95 (new tunnel), and the O'Donnell Street exit off of Route 895 (old tunnel). Click here for map.
   The Summer Party will be held on August 19, and the Christmas Party is scheduled for December 16.
   Some changes have been made to the time frames: 
      1. The hours for the parties are now 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., instead of Noon to 4 p.m.
       2. No one will be allowed in the hall until 20 minutes prior to the start of the festivities.
   Get your envelopes in by August 6 for the Summer Party, and December 6 for the Christmas Party.
   New member: David Asher (Davidson Motors)
   Sick members: Ed Jackson, John Kirschke, Mel Holden, Steve Glowacki
   Deceased members: Anthony Ventura (Hall Motors) and John Dobbs (Baltimore Sun)
   Please keep these members and their families in your thoughts and prayers.
   The next meeting will be July 15 in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local 355, 1030 S. Dukeland St., Baltimore, MD.  Coffee and donuts are served at 9:30 a.m. There will be no August meeting as the Summer Party will take its place. The Executive Board meets at 10 a.m., and the General Meeting begins at 11 a.m. A light lunch is served following the meeting. Hope to see you there. Remember to bring another retiree with you.

Fraternally, 

Bob Eney,
A.R.M. President


January/February 2010 Newsletter
Jan 07, 2010

Brothers and Sisters:

This is a reminder that the regular local union meeting scheduled for Sunday, January 3, has been rescheduled to Sunday, January 10.

Well, the Christmas party was another huge success. We had well over 220 members and guests attending. I thought that everything was extremely well done. We had real silverware and glasses (no plastic). The food was very good. Yes, there were a couple of small problems; they were resolved right away. We realize that we are not going to please everyone all the time, but I think that some of you expect perfection and you are not going to get it. You can't tell me that you haven't had problems in fancy restaurants. I mean, where else are you going to get what you get for free? We are talking open bar, oysters, bottle beer, good food, and desserts.

Congrats to Diane Adams for winning the very nice 50/50. Congrats to Lee Rausch for winning the basket of cheer. Lee and her husband Bob turned around and donated all of the bottles of liquor back to the club. Thank you.

We want to extend a special thanks to all of the people who set this party up, and to all who worked selling the tickets and handling the cake wheel.     

A very special thanks to all of you who bought the 50/50's and the basket of cheer tickets and who brought in the cakes for the cake wheel.  This party was for you, and if it wasn't for you it wouldn't be the great success that it is.     

Those of you who were at the Christmas party probably noticed a young lady going around acting like a reporter for the Daily Planet. Her name is Lesley Phillips, and she's with the Joint Council.  Lesley just set up a Local #355 website:  www.teamsters355.com.  On the left-hand side of the home page, you'll see a link titled "Retirees," where you will find pictures and an article about the Christmas party.  

While Brother Rich Parker's bowling scores are lower than normal, his appetite for the crab soup was above average as he was seen hovering around the bowl quite a few times.

New Members:  Steve Davis, LMC; Edwin M. Foard, Sun Papers;  John D. Irwin, Blue Diamond;  James T. McVey, Active Transportation;  Jerry Jordan, US Foods;  Wesley Corbin, Mason-Dixon;  Don Norris, UPS;  Daniel Williams, APA Transport.

Deceased Members: Russell Lawhorn, R&F Transport.

Sick Members: Milton Stapf

The January meeting will be held on Thursday, the 21st, and the February meeting on Thursday the 18th, in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local Union #355, 1030 South Dukeland Street , Baltimore. Coffee and donuts are served starting at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Board meets at 10:00 a.m. The General Meeting starts at 11:00 a.m. A light lunch will be served following the general meeting. 

Remember to bring another retired member with you to the meetings. If Baltimore City schools are closed because of inclement weather, there will be no meeting that day. On behalf of the executive board, I wish each and every one of you a happy and safe new year.

Fraternally,                                                     

Bob Eney,  

ARM President


 

 

 

 


November/December Newsletter
Nov 03, 2009

Brothers and Sisters:

Well, once again it's that time of the year that many of us despise. It's getting closer to winter, and we have to set our clocks back November 1. Gee, it'll be dark at 4:30! We have been informed that the local is in the process of setting up a Web page, and we will have a link for the retirees. This should be done by the first of the year. Hopefully, we can get our own website soon afterwards.

We have the Christmas Party and the holidays coming up. The Christmas Party will be held at the Town & Country Hall in Lansdowne. The date is December 17th, noon to 4:00 p.m., and the envelopes have to be ready by December 7th. Don't forget your cakes for the cake wheel. We need volunteers to run the cake wheel. Please see brother Frank Supoit if you can help.The fall golf tournament at Westminster National was a success. The tournament was won by a foursome of retirees: Vern Williams, Gerry Wheaton, Carroll Sadler, Sr. and Henry Shimko. We can always use more golfers for our Spring outing – place and date yet to be decided.

Thanks to Brother Bob Marshall for the information about the Secretary of Veteran Affairs Office establishing service connection in association about Agent Orange. This pertains to any veteran who was in Vietnam. More information can be found at http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/

Dates of interest coming up are:
Nov. 1: Set your clocks back one hour
Nov. 11: Veterans Day - this should be a major holiday
Nov. 26: Thanksgiving
Dec. 7: Pear Harbor Day
Dec. 25: Christmas

New member: Ted Lesniewski (UPS)

Sick members: Ed Jackson, Charles Singleton, Charlie Kurtz

Deceased members: Toney Trent (Leaseway), William O'Connell (Mountainside)

Please keep these members in your thoughts and prayers.

The November meeting will be held on Thursday the 19th in the Sullivan Hall at Teamsters Local #355, 1030 South Dukeland Street in Baltimore. Remember to bring another member with you to the meeting. Hope to see you then!

Fraternally,

Bob Eney
ARM President

P.S. On behalf of the executive board, I wish you a Merry Christmas and a safe and Happy New Year.


Ron Ash retiress
May 06, 2010

   After almost 43 years with Aircraft Service International Group, Ron Ash is handing over his fuel truck keys for the last time today, and heading south to retirement and his family in Florida. “My wife retired from the Feds seven years ago, and she’s been in Florida the last five years waiting for me to retire too,” Ron told us. “I’ve been flying back and forth once or twice a month. It’s been hard on us, being separated like this. She finally said ‘Enough is enough! Retire!’ So this is it.”
   “Mr. Ash”– as he is respectfully called by coworkers and managers alike – is an aircraft refueler at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. In his capacity as Fuel Lead, he’s responsible for scheduling six other drivers that cover refueling for all flights of a specific airline during any given shift. “I’m proud to have that responsibilty. It isn’t easy to shuffle trucks and people efficiently to ensure the planes are fueled on schedule,” Ron told us.
   “On average, it takes 15 to 20 minutes to fuel a jet with 8,000 gallons of fuel, and that’s not including set up time,” he said, adding “A one-way flight to Florida uses 2,000 gallons – that’s 13,000 pounds of jet fuel.”
   A local shop steward for over 30 years, Ron said he likes people and helping them with their problems, adding “I can talk to anybody.” It was easy for him because he knew the job, what it takes to perform well, and knew what to do or who to see to solve a problem. “Sometimes I was the bad guy if I didn’t get the right results. But that’s just part of the job of being a shop steward. Things don’t always go the way we’d like, but we do the best we can.”
   Ron admitted that as much as he’s looking forward to spending more time with his family, who all now live in Florida, retirement is bittersweet. He loved his job – the only job he’s had since he graduated from high school.
   Ron was born and raised in Baltimore City. He served two years in the Army’s 82nd Airborne Division and a tour in Korea, then married the love of his life in 1974. “My life wasn’t really going in a good direction, but my wife changed me around,” Ron said. “Marrying her was the high point of my life.”­ They have one son and a 13-year-old granddaughter who, by all accounts, is the sunshine in his life. 
   “The family needs me. I’ve been going back and forth to Florida since we bought a house there five years ago. It’s worn me out. So now I’m gonna do some golfing and fishing, and be a snowbird: we’ll live in Florida nine months and here (at their home in Carroll County) three months of the year. Easy!” Ron said with a big grin.
   Good luck, Mr. Ash, and God speed.




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